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Wednesday, November 19
 

7:30am

Registration
Wednesday November 19, 2014 7:30am - 8:30am
Virginia Ballroom Foyer

8:30am

Keynote - Larry Lessig
Speakers
LL

Larry Lessig

Lawrence Lessig is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at Harvard Law School, and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University. | | Prior to rejoining the Harvard faculty, Lessig was a professor at Stanford Law School, where he founded the school’s Center for Internet and Society, and at the University of Chicago.


Wednesday November 19, 2014 8:30am - 9:30am
Virginia Ballroom

9:45am

Landscape of OER Strategic Challenges and Opportunities
As the quantity and quality of OER increases, a range of issues to improve author education, funding coordination, and a series of issues around attribution are among those that need addressing. This session is about planning for success by identifying challenges that are likely to arise as more authors, funders, and users engage with OER. When the lid of copyright constraint is removed, other policies will bear the brunt of regulating reuse - such as conformity with educational standards. In other cases, as updating OER becomes distributed, complex attribution issues around apportioning credit for versions 3, 4, and 5 of OER need to be anticipated and addressed.

Speakers
MC

Michael Carroll

American University Washington College of Law/Creative Commons United States
avatar for Cable Green

Cable Green

Director of Open Education, Creative Commons
Cable is an "Open Education & Policy" guy. Cable works with the global open education community to leverage open licensing, OER, open policies, and open pedagogy to significantly improve access to quality, affordable, education and research resources so everyone in the world can attain all the education they desire.
avatar for Meredith Jacob

Meredith Jacob

Assistant Director, Creative Commons United States
I work at American University Washington College of Law - at the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property - pijip.org. We're also the home of Creative Commons United States - the US Creative Commons Affiliate. | | I'm interested in public interest intellectual property, open access, and open education.


Wednesday November 19, 2014 9:45am - 10:15am
Richmond

9:45am

From theory to practice: can openness improve the quality of OER research?
Researching the impact of open educational resources (OER) in the open has been a core aim of the OER Research Hub project (REF ONE, OERRH) since it began at the end of 2012. But has this open approach to research improved the quality of our research on the impact of OER?

This paper explores the ways in which open research practices have enabled us to improve the quality of our research. We have utilized a range of open research practices including:

1. "Agile research" (REF TWO): our ability to be responsive to feedback and continuously evaluate the way in which we work has led to positive adjustments to our own practice.

2. Openly licensing our research instruments and all project outputs (inc. anonymised research data), blogging the progress of our collaborative research and disseminating research results as-and-when they are available. This has encouraged feedback from our stakeholders, and enabled us to broaden and network our existing range of collaborators.

3. Sharing experiences and ideas through collaboration: we will be exploring and reflecting on our experiences of researching OER in the open in June through the launch of our course on open research via School of Open (P2PU). Beginning with an exploration of the theory and practice of open research, course participants will also actively explore the role of reflection in open research, what role openness has in the dissemination of research findings and ethical considerations for open researchers.

In this paper the research team will reflect on our open research approaches and the experience of sharing these via School of Open. We ask: how can we improve OER research through openness' What worked and what didn't in our project? Which of our open practices did we change as the project progressed? And what benefits can openness bring to researching OER in particular?

REF ONE: http://oerresearchhub.org
REF TWO: Becoming more agile researchers: experiences from researching open educational resources McAndrew, P. 2013, http://www.slideshare.net/openpad/agile-research-for-open-education-reso

Speakers
avatar for Bea de los Arcos

Bea de los Arcos

Research Associate, The Open University
Dr. Beatriz de los Arcos Researcher, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, United Kingdom | Researching the impact of OER on teaching and learning practices with colleagues at the OER Research Hub Project; leading the project's collaboration with educational programs in the K12 sector. |  
avatar for Rob Farrow

Rob Farrow

Research Fellow, The Open University
Research Fellow @openuniversity / Open Education through a philosophical lens / Projects: @oer_hub @gogn_oer @oerworldmap @JIME_journal / Cat: @tailz_of_terror | | Project URLS: | http://oerhub.net/ | https://oerworldmap.org/ | http://go-gn.net/ | http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/
avatar for Beck Pitt

Beck Pitt

Research Assistant, The Open University
Hi there! I'm a researcher on the Open Education Research Hub and Opening Educational Practices in Scotland (OEPS) project at the Open University (UK). Find out more: http://oerresearchhub.org | | Come and talk to me about all things open and how we (the Hub) could help you!


Wednesday November 19, 2014 9:45am - 10:15am
Roanoke

9:45am

Opportunities and Challenges for OER in the K-12 Environment
Use of OER in the K-12 environment has its own set of opportunities and challenges.

As a part of a legislative mandate to identify a collection of OER courseware aligned with the Common Core State Standards, the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) in Washington conducted a review of resources targeting secondary math and English Language Arts. As a follow up to this review, OSPI developed a competitive grant program for districts interested in adapting materials based on reviewer feedback and/or implementing open resources in the classroom.

Five school districts in Washington State received grants. They act as case studies from a variety of teaching environments "large districts to small schools in both rural and urban areas. Hear about the goals, challenges, and successes of each of the model projects below:

Lake Washington School District
Lake Washington School District is located in the suburbs east of Seattle. It is the fifth-largest school district in Washington. The district is working to adapt OER high school science textbooks aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards and develop supplemental OER teaching materials and resources to bring to the school board as an option for district adoption.

Selkirk School District
Selkirk School District is a two-school, rural district in the northeast corner of Washington. As a small school district, often old or outdated curriculum materials are used, as funds are scarce with regard to new curriculum purchases. Three secondary classes are piloting and implementing OER resources in Algebra I, 11th and 12th grade English, and Biology. Their new 1:1 environment creates an incredible opportunity to incorporate OER materials into their instructional program.

Southwest Washington Math Consortium
With grant funds, a consortium of four school districts will complete their district-developed Algebra 1 curriculum, pilot the material in the classroom, and design accompanying professional development resources. Prior to the grant, the materials were limited in access to the participating school districts. As a CC BY licensing requirement was placed on all materials created with grant funds, this work will now be available to all.

Spokane Public Schools
Spokane Public Schools is the largest school district in eastern Washington and the second largest in the state. OER grant funds will help launch the district's K-8 implementation of an OER mathematics curriculum, including professional development for instructional leaders and math support resources for students and parents.

Sunnyside School District
Sunnyside School District is located in the heart of the Yakima Valley in central Washington. They will implement a Common Core aligned OER curriculum across the 6-11 grade bands and are creating resources to support teachers in curriculum implementation and ensure successful student completion of both the new Common Core assessments and WA state exit exams.

Speakers
avatar for Karl Nelson

Karl Nelson

Director, Digital Learning, WA OSPI
avatar for Barbara Soots

Barbara Soots

OER and Instructional Materials Program Manager, OSPI
Barbara Soots is the Open Educational Resources Program Manager at the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in Washington. She implements state legislation directing creation of an openly licensed courseware library with alignment to state K-12 learning standards. She also manages an awareness campaign informing school districts about open resources and their importance in the changing educational landscape.


Wednesday November 19, 2014 9:45am - 10:15am
Virginia Ballroom

9:45am

Libraries & Open Educational Resources
This opening panel for the first-ever Libraries & OER track at OpenEd will set the stage for an exciting and fast-paced day of panel discussions. The panel will consist of two presentations, followed by shared Q&A at the end.

1. Lay of the Land: Libraries and OER
Nicole Allen, SPARC; Marilyn Billings, UMass Amherst

Why should libraries care about Open Education? How have libraries been involved so far? How does this relate to libraries’ work to promote Open Access? In this talk, the coordinators of the OpenEd libraries and OER track will provide context for the critical role libraries can play in the broader Open Education movement and a high-level overview of how libraries have been involved so far.

2. Librarians’ perceptions and use of OER
Rebecca Pitt, The Open University (UK)

How do librarians share the OER they create? And do they measure the impact of these resources? The OER Research Hub’s (http://oerresearchhub.org) collaboration with the Co-PILOT (Community of Practice for Information Literacy Online Teaching) project (http://delilaopen.wordpress.com/project-co-pilot/) produced a range of research findings on librarian’s perceptions and use of open educational resources (OER). The focus of our work was a questionnaire that covered topics including open licensing, institutional policies on OER and reflective practice. Working collaboratively we developed additional survey questions focused on specific areas of interest to the librarian community. This approach helped us to gather further data and provided a “snapshot” of current practice. Building on the work presented by Pitt, Graham & Zazani at OER14 this paper will examine some of the key findings from this research, which involved over 200 full- or part-time librarians, whilst reflecting on the contextual differences and issues librarians around the world face.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e
avatar for Steven J. Bell

Steven J. Bell

Associate University Librarian, Temple University
I enjoy exploring the intersection of academic librarianship and higher education. I'm passionate about exploring how we design better library experiences for community members - and the ways we can better integrate the academic library into the teaching and learning that happens at our institutions. Follow me at /blendedlib or my Library Journal Academic Newswire columns http://lj.libraryjournal.com/category/opinion/steven-bell/ and... Read More →
MB

Marilyn Billings

Scholarly Communication & Special Initiatives Libr, University of Massachusetts Amherst
avatar for Beck Pitt

Beck Pitt

Research Assistant, The Open University
Hi there! I'm a researcher on the Open Education Research Hub and Opening Educational Practices in Scotland (OEPS) project at the Open University (UK). Find out more: http://oerresearchhub.org | | Come and talk to me about all things open and how we (the Hub) could help you!


Wednesday November 19, 2014 9:45am - 10:45am
Crystal Ballroom

10:15am

OCW Educator: Sharing the How as well as the What
OCW's mission has always been to share openly course materials created by MIT professors for use in on-campus instruction. These materials include syllabi, reading lists, assignments, lecture notes, lecture slides, and in some cases video lectures and recitations. But there is little by way of how the instructor uses these materials, why the instructor teaches the course they way she does, and what students do in given semester. OCW has tried to remedy this situation with OCW Educator, an initiative that enhances OCW course sites for educators. A new course page called "This Course at MIT" provides additional information about the class, such as what kinds of students typically take a class, how students spend their time, what kind of classroom is used, and what learning outcomes the instructor intends. In some cases, instructors explain in detail why they have structured the course a certain way, how they go about teaching problem-solving, how they have changed the course over the years, how they foster team-building and active learning, and how they teach effective writing. OCW Educator also offers the opportunity to present information about project-based courses and experiential courses that don't lend themselves to traditional OCW publication. Perhaps most significantly, OCW Educator documents changes in pedagogy brought about by the introduction of digital tools and resources in MIT classrooms, such as immediate feedback through online assessments.

Speakers
JP

Joseph Pickett

Publication Director, MIT OpenCourseWare


Wednesday November 19, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am
Richmond

10:15am

Creativity with Control – Improving the quality of open education research through a blended project management environment.
The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation funded OER Research Hub is an ambitious project which combines research collaboration with existing OER initiatives; an international fellowship program; and a global hub for research data and excellence in practice (McAndrew & Farrow, 2013). Managing and co-ordinating a project of this scope raised a number of challenges. The project team sought to blend a traditional and agile project management environment to create the most responsive, flexible and creative hybrid environment possible to accommodate the project's ambitions.
We believe we have created a control environment that delivers creative academic research project outputs and, furthermore, that this environment can be replicated and used across the sector to improve the overall quality of open education research. Key to this is a blend of traditional and "agile" research which approaches research questions creatively while maintaining the Institute of Educational Technology's (IET) reputation for the delivery of high quality research.
Traditional project management (PRINCE2, 2009) involves very deliberate planning and control activities. From a project management perspective, OER Research Hub raises a number of challenges:
- A distributed collaboration model
- Global research remit
- Establishing an "agile" workflow which makes effective use of human resources
- Harmonising research activities toward one overall view of OER impact
- Finding ways to deliver services of use to the OER community
- Inadequacy of typical staged delivery model
We sought to blend our own mix of traditional and agile methodologies. Our traditional approach requires significant upfront planning with clearly defined tasks and activities undertaken to deliver individual products. This method assumes that activities are predictable and well understood, and are linear in their delivery. Even though clear direction and requirements were specified in the original proposal, the very nature of impact research requires you to seek out and reveal unique insight and possibilities often in non-linear and unpredictable ways.
Agile project management methodologies prominent in software and IT development (Hoda et al, 2008) were co-opted into research and project management. The "scrum" approach that we used consists of many rapid initiative planning and development cycles, allowing the project team to constantly evaluate the evolving product and obtain immediate feedback from users or stakeholders. When we looked at what our researchers were being tasked with and how they were being asked to undertake that work a great deal of similarities were identified with the agile methodology. Our evolving product was our research data; our stakeholders were collaborations and the open education community; and we needed to know if our research was providing the answers that they required in order to inform their policy decisions. The adapted "agile" methodology allowed us to focus on specific problem areas, to be flexible and to follow where the research led.
This presentation will discuss the blending of the planned and "agile" approaches, how this was managed and what the blended approach gave us in terms of improved quality of research in open education.


References
Hoda, R., Noble, J. & Marshall, S. (2008) Agile Project Management, published in the proceedings of the New Zealand Computer Science Research Student Conference 2008, April 2008, Christchurch, New Zealand, pp. 218-221

Managing Successful Projects with PRINCE2: 2009 Edition, Office of Government Commerce (OGC), London

McAndrew, Patrick and Farrow, Robert (2013). The ecology of sharing: synthesizing OER research. In: OER 13: Creating a virtuous circle, 26-27 March 2013, Nottingham.

Speakers
GE

Gary Elliott-Cirigottis

The Open University
avatar for Claire Walker

Claire Walker

Project Coordinator, The Open University
I'm a PRINCE2 Practitioner and am the Project Co-ordinator for the OER Research Hub project based at the Open University in the UK. | | The Open Educational Resources Research Hub (OER Research Hub) provides a focus for research, designed to give answers to the overall question ‘What is the impact of OER on learning and teaching practices?’ and identify the particular influence of openness. We are working in collaboration with... Read More →


Wednesday November 19, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am
Roanoke

10:15am

OER in K-12: How can we best advance adoption?
In this session, which will be structured as an open discussion among participants, we'll talk about OER adoption in K-12. While OER awareness in K-12 has increased, actual use is not accelerating as quickly as expected.

With this as a premise, we'll explore the current K-12 use of OER, where it is succeeding and where it is lagging. Where is adoption and use happening? Where is it not happening? What types of environments are most interested in K-12 OER? What are the areas of strong interest that are most likely to lead to deeper use? What needs do K-12 educators have in this regard? What types of content, learning experiences, delivery models, etc. do they want? What type of ongoing support do they need? What other user issues or needs should we be thinking about?

The goal of this session will be not to focus on the barriers of OER adoption in K-12, but instead to look at where there are opportunities for increased use and to identify what might help solidify that use. Possible topics to explore may include policy, research needs, quality, adoption decision support, professional development, etc. These issues will be examined at the federal, state, district, school, and grassroots levels, as relevant and of interest to the group assembled at the session.

The format of this session will be a facilitated conversation rather than a presentation. Questions such as those suggested above will be framed in an inquiry progression to encourage design thinking and innovative approaches from the panelists and the audience.The facilitator will pose questions for brainstorming, and the conversation points will be recorded on an interactive document, which can be used by all during the session and afterward.

It is hoped that by the end of this session, several concrete, actionable items will be identified and then fleshed out for future work.

Speakers
avatar for Sara Frank Bristow

Sara Frank Bristow

Founder, Lead Researcher, Salient Research LLC
Sara is an education researcher and consultant in global K-12 and higher education, with an emphasis on blended and online education (policy and practice), OER, and the use of wikis as educational tools. Clients and collaborators include the OER Research Hub (The Open University), the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL), Evergreen Education Group, CompetencyWorks, Wiki Strategies, The University of Mississippi, and KMDI... Read More →
avatar for Karen Fasimpaur

Karen Fasimpaur

K12 Open Ed
I am passionate about the potential of open resources to engage learners and differentiate learning, especially in K-12. | | I run a small ed tech consulting company, am a community leader for the School of Ed on P2PU, and am a prolific writer.
avatar for Barbara Soots

Barbara Soots

OER and Instructional Materials Program Manager, OSPI
Barbara Soots is the Open Educational Resources Program Manager at the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in Washington. She implements state legislation directing creation of an openly licensed courseware library with alignment to state K-12 learning standards. She also manages an awareness campaign informing school districts about open resources and their importance in the changing educational landscape.


Wednesday November 19, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am
Virginia Ballroom

10:15am

Libraries & Open Educational Resources Cont'd
This opening panel for the first-ever Libraries & OER track at OpenEd will set the stage for an exciting and fast-paced day of panel discussions. The panel will consist of two presentations, followed by shared Q&A at the end.

1. Lay of the Land: Libraries and OER
Nicole Allen, SPARC; Marilyn Billings, UMass Amherst

Why should libraries care about Open Education? How have libraries been involved so far? How does this relate to libraries’ work to promote Open Access? In this talk, the coordinators of the OpenEd libraries and OER track will provide context for the critical role libraries can play in the broader Open Education movement and a high-level overview of how libraries have been involved so far.

2. Librarians’ perceptions and use of OER
Rebecca Pitt, The Open University (UK)

How do librarians share the OER they create? And do they measure the impact of these resources? The OER Research Hub’s (http://oerresearchhub.org) collaboration with the Co-PILOT (Community of Practice for Information Literacy Online Teaching) project (http://delilaopen.wordpress.com/project-co-pilot/) produced a range of research findings on librarian’s perceptions and use of open educational resources (OER). The focus of our work was a questionnaire that covered topics including open licensing, institutional policies on OER and reflective practice. Working collaboratively we developed additional survey questions focused on specific areas of interest to the librarian community. This approach helped us to gather further data and provided a “snapshot” of current practice. Building on the work presented by Pitt, Graham & Zazani at OER14 this paper will examine some of the key findings from this research, which involved over 200 full- or part-time librarians, whilst reflecting on the contextual differences and issues librarians around the world face.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e
avatar for Steven J. Bell

Steven J. Bell

Associate University Librarian, Temple University
I enjoy exploring the intersection of academic librarianship and higher education. I'm passionate about exploring how we design better library experiences for community members - and the ways we can better integrate the academic library into the teaching and learning that happens at our institutions. Follow me at /blendedlib or my Library Journal Academic Newswire columns http://lj.libraryjournal.com/category/opinion/steven-bell/ and... Read More →
MB

Marilyn Billings

Scholarly Communication & Special Initiatives Libr, University of Massachusetts Amherst
avatar for Beck Pitt

Beck Pitt

Research Assistant, The Open University
Hi there! I'm a researcher on the Open Education Research Hub and Opening Educational Practices in Scotland (OEPS) project at the Open University (UK). Find out more: http://oerresearchhub.org | | Come and talk to me about all things open and how we (the Hub) could help you!


Wednesday November 19, 2014 10:15am - 11:15am
Crystal Ballroom

11:00am

Recipe for Success – A Behind the Scenes Tour of the 'OER Kitchen' at Mountain Heights Academy
Mountain Heights Academy, formerly Open High School of Utah, is an online, public charter school serving 500 students in grades 7-12. Part of our mission is for teachers to find, create, and customize open educational resource content to best meet student needs. Since the school opened in 2009, students have been hungry consumers of OER curriculum, but have not been consciously aware of what they were consuming. In 2011, a couple of teachers invited a handful of students to collaborate with them to augment, supplement, or replace existing open resources - with exciting results. Students became more invested in their own performance, in addition to wanting to help others succeed. Based on student feedback and level of interest, Mountain Heights launched a school-wide campaign in 2012 to increase student OER awareness, and to invite greater levels of student/student, and student/teacher collaboration in content creation. By 2013, students were actively creating content in multiple subject areas, using a variety of methods, and had grasped key benefits of the power of OER, such as customization, deeper learning, engagement, legacy, and motivation. The school conducted quarterly contests to incentivize students to consider additional content creation throughout the semester.

Although the ingredients change according to subject and need, the process is generally the same, and the outcome is promising. Come and hear from Mountain Heights' sous-chefs and see what they have been creating in the OER kitchen this year.

Speakers
avatar for DeLaina Tonks

DeLaina Tonks

Director, Mountain Heights Academy
I am the Director of Mountain Heights Academy (formerly the Open High School of Utah), an online public charter school committed to building and sharing OER curricula.


Wednesday November 19, 2014 11:00am - 11:30am
Richmond

11:00am

Perceptions of socio-ethical stances surrounding massive online open courses.
INTRODUCTION Open education provides opportunities for anyone with digital access to engage in learning far beyond the classroom and throughout their lives, although this notion is not without challenges. When learners formally enroll on a course with an institution they are under the jurisdiction of academic policies, and are immersed in the cultural norms of their community, which are both motivational and supportive. For distance learning where students are enrolled but isolated, the transfer of academic values is more troublesome (1). For "open" learners, either using open educational resources (OERs) or massive online open courses (MOOCs), students are autonomous and even more isolated from institutions and communities.

The question remains, what strategies should institutions or individuals running open courses have in place to ensure that educational opportunities are implemented in a socially and ethically sound way?

Research by Rolfe in 2013 (2) concluded that more work was needed to explore the academic and socio-ethical stances surrounding open courses, with only a small number of identified empirical studies addressing the issue. One might surmise that these are therefore not important matters, but an accompanying narrative synthesis of blog articles from educationalists and experts found that there were quite significant concerns over academic quality, inclusivity and engagement, and data privacy and protection of learners (2). The present research aims to extend this work by using phenomenological approaches to explore people's perceptions of the academic values and socio-ethical stances associated with open learning.

APPROACH A series of semi-structured interviews were carried out based on the domains of enquiry from the review (2). Volunteers included university management, lecturers, technologists and open course users. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Important statements of text were copied into Microsoft Excel, and the two authors clustered the statements to match the original domains or to form new themes. A follow-up questionnaire consolidated the conclusions drawn. The work was ethically approved.

RESULTS Those interviewed agreed that the quality of open courses and learner experience was extremely variable, regardless of the form of the course, e.g. connectivist MOOC or xMOOC. It was felt that institutions engaging in MOOCs should be more socially and ethically responsible to ensure students have equal opportunities and safe spaces to learn. A narrative is emerging around the important role of the facilitator or educator in preventing exclusion and disengagement, again, regardless of the form of MOOC.

CONCLUSION A lack of socio-ethical responsibility toward learners is accompanied by poor online experiences in some open courses. Our thinking and research needs to catch up with the technology to support institutions in developing policies and strategies for open education, and to ensure that learners can genuinely reap the benefits on offer.


REFERENCES
1 Brey P. (2006) Social and Ethical Dimensions of Computer-Mediated Education. Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, 2, pp. 91-102.

2 Rolfe V. (2013) MOOCs and social responsibility toward learners. In OPEN-ED Open Education 2013. Utah, Park City, November 2013.

Speakers
avatar for Vivien Rolfe

Vivien Rolfe

Lecturer, University of the West of England
Sharing open educational resources to support life sciences education. Like to animate physiological processes. Saxophoning. Dog walking. Jellied Eels.


Wednesday November 19, 2014 11:00am - 11:30am
Roanoke

11:00am

Meeting Common Core Instructional Shifts through OER
In 2012 ISKME initiated the Primary Source Project (PSP), working with educators across four states. The goal of the project was to address educator needs for discoverability and engagement with high quality, openly licensed primary sources, particularly informational texts, that support the cross-subject literacy shifts called for by the new U.S. education standards, the Common Core State Standards. Through the project, participating educators selected and critiqued a set of informational texts, and developed cross-subject, wraparound lessons that support students' ability to access, critically analyze, and build evidence-based arguments from texts. Based on examination of the lesson building process, an instructional design pathway tool was created - with openly licensed professional learning materials and lesson exemplars - to support future educators in selecting and sequencing informational texts, and in collaborating with colleagues across subjects to create integrated lessons around those texts. This presentation will discuss how this model can be used to support OER adoption in K-12 by demonstrating the necessary teacher collaboration needed to integrate the new standards across disciplines, to enable feedback loops and knowledge sharing around Common Core instructional shifts, and to leverage digital technology and openly licensed content to fill curriculum needs.

Speakers
avatar for Amee Evans Godwin

Amee Evans Godwin

Director, Strategic Initiatives, ISKME
CJ

Cynthia Jimes

Director of Research and Learning, ISKME


Wednesday November 19, 2014 11:00am - 11:30am
Virginia Ballroom

11:00am

Going Open: How Libraries are Advancing OER Adoption on Campus
This panel will combine three presentations around the theme of how libraries can play a role in supporting the adoption of OER. Each presenter will speak for 15 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of joint Q&A.

Providing a Push: Five Ways Academic Librarians Can Encourage Faculty to go Open
Steven Bell, Temple University

Librarians are typically perceived as academic support professionals who wait to be asked to take a role in a new campus initiative. But owing to the library's campus neutrality and connections with the disciplines, is often the case that academic librarians are well suited to adopt a leadership role in advancing reforms in scholarship and publishing. Academic librarians can also adopt more aggressive strategies to proactively promote OER to faculty. Academic librarians can apply their experience in promoting the value of open access to their communities to an OER initiative. In this presentation, attendees will be introduced to five actions academic librarians can take to introduce faculty to the benefits of adopting OER in their courses. These approaches will include projects that incentivize faculty to use OER, bringing OER advocates to campus to promote the benefits, creating internal support communities, and organizing campus events to promote the value of shifting to openness in higher education.

Library Piloted OER Adoption: From Flight to Foundation - Transforming OER from Concept to Concrete
John Schoppert, Columbia Gorge Community College

Libraries are a central component of any campus, but are often overlooked by all they serve. Yet libraries are a unique catalyst for change. Because libraries are at the intersection of student instruction, faculty support, and administrative duties, they are perfectly situated for taking OER initiatives from an idea to a sustainable framework. In this session, the director of the Columbia Gorge Community College library will show how the CGCC library moved from an initiative of OER adoption to building a concrete, workable plan that includes student involvement, faculty adoption, bookstore concerns, administration acceptance, and foundation funding support. What were the pitfalls along the way? What can be avoided? How do you create a working program? How many signatures do you need? This session will also include advice on engaging faculty about OER advocacy and creating a sustainable OER culture institution-wide.

Leading from the Library: The Power of Academic Libraries in OER Advocacy
Ann Agee & Christina Mune, San Jose State University

The mission of the university library has always been to provide access to quality information resources. Additionally, academic librarians are expected to understand fair use and copyright policies, and are often called upon to provide advice on the legal use of materials. This heritage places university librarians in a unique position to reach out to faculty and promote open educational resources for classroom use. This session explores how librarians at one campus have embraced their heritage and this challenge by implementing multiple strategies to provide and advocate for the use of OER as a replacement for textbooks in the classroom. Strategies include grants for OER authorship and adoption, partnerships with eReader vendors, behind-the-scenes work to match OER with existing courses, and novel faculty recognition events. Learn what worked, what did not work, and how future tactics are being adapted. Participants will come away with multiple potential strategies for assisting faculty in the adoption of OER as an alternative to the textbook.

Moderators
MB

Marilyn Billings

Scholarly Communication & Special Initiatives Libr, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Speakers
avatar for Ann Agee

Ann Agee

Academic Liaison Librarian, San Jose State University
Since 2012, I have been a coordinator of the Affordable Learning Solutions (ALS) campaign at San Jose State University (SJSU). ALS is a California State University initiative designed to encourage faculty to adopt low-cost classroom materials to replace expensive textbooks. These alternatives include online course readers, open e-textbooks, open courseware, and other digital resources. In this position, I have organized workshops, webinars, grant... Read More →
avatar for Steven J. Bell

Steven J. Bell

Associate University Librarian, Temple University
I enjoy exploring the intersection of academic librarianship and higher education. I'm passionate about exploring how we design better library experiences for community members - and the ways we can better integrate the academic library into the teaching and learning that happens at our institutions. Follow me at /blendedlib or my Library Journal Academic Newswire columns http://lj.libraryjournal.com/category/opinion/steven-bell/ and... Read More →
avatar for Christina Mune

Christina Mune

Digital Initiatives Librarian, San Jose State University
I'm the digital initiatives librarian at San Jose State University (SJSU). As a coordinator of SJSU's Affordable Learning Solutions I promote open access and open educational resources as replacements for expensive textbooks and course materials. I'm interested in creating engaging digital experiences that enhance teaching and learning, both in the library and the classroom - at no cost to students!
avatar for John Schoppert

John Schoppert

Director of Library Services, Columbia Gore Community College
I have been a musician, a cook, a baker, a bookseller, and a bookstore owner; all of these professions laid the foundation for teamwork, community building, and outreach. Now, as the Library Director at Columbia Gorge Community College (CGCC), I'm at the center of change brought about by the emergence of the OER movement. In collaboration with faculty, staff, and administration, I've help CGCC build and implement an OER pilot program that... Read More →


Wednesday November 19, 2014 11:00am - 12:00pm
Crystal Ballroom

11:30am

K-12 Blueprint for Course Construction
The Georgia Virtual School has been developing K-12 OER Courses for the past three years. We have worked hard to train the Subject Matter Experts as well as course reviewers to locate OER Resources, cite the material, and organize it for course development.

Reuse: Let us share with you our favorite sites for locating K-12 resources in various subject areas.

Remix: We can help you understand how we take OER information and create something new for our courses.

Create: We spend time and effort creating original OER Resources to incorporate in conjunction with other OER Material to make a complete course.

Redistribute: GAVS offers their content out there for the public! See our site and view our courses.

Speakers
TE

Tami Echard

Supervisor of Instructional Development, Georgia Virtual School
We will be starting our fourth year of OER Course development for 6-12 courses. We are starting an Elementary School Spanish Pilot program and will add some OER Resources for this level as well.


Wednesday November 19, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm
Richmond

11:30am

Community Input on Simon DataLab
Carnegie Mellon University's recently announced Simon Initiative aims to build upon and expand the vast learning-science and technology-enhanced educational ecosystem within CMU and across the university's collaborations with other groups and institutions. Key to this initiative is the continued development of an open repository for data and methods for education. Called the Simon DataLab, this new resource builds upon the world's oldest and largest repository of open learning science data (PSLC's DataShop) to create an intellectual data commons that drives continuous improvement in student learning outcomes.

As a first step in launching the Simon DataLab, CMU is planning for the development of new tools that will lower the barriers to contributing data to the repository, and to using this data in improving and evaluating learning experiences. These tools will take advantage of datasets that may be less robust than the tutor data that currently drives DataShop (such as MOOC and LMS data), while encouraging subsequent improvement in course design that would allow for the use of more robust analytic tools. Current plans are for tools to identify unmet learning objectives (milestones that are not achieved during the course); these tools would support instructional designers and faculty in evaluating these obstacles, and identifying additional instructional approaches that may be valuable in future offerings of the course. A second tool proposed for development will aim to identify barriers to course completion students -- those course features that lead to premature student dropout. This information should help course designers to consider modifications to mitigate student loss and increase course completion rates.

In addition to these specific tools, the Simon DataLab team is also engaged in a redesign of the current DataShop interfaces, with the goal of identifying and improving those components that currently serve to limit or prevent engagement and use of the DataShop tools. As part of this work, the team will create additional tools for importing and sharing additional types of learning data from a broader array of sources.

This session will focus on soliciting feedback from the Open Education community on current barriers to the contribution and use of open learning data and on the tools and interface plans that are currently in place for Simon DataLab. Specific questions for discussion include: Are the proposed tools for import and analysis useful and usable as planned? What are specific barriers for educators and institutions in contributing and using open learning data? How can the Simon DataLab lower technical and policy barriers to promote a more open data and methods repository? This input will help to guide Simon DataLab development.

Speakers
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University


Wednesday November 19, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm
Roanoke

11:30am

Going Open: How Libraries are Advancing OER Adoption on Campus Cont'd
This panel will combine three presentations around the theme of how libraries can play a role in supporting the adoption of OER. Each presenter will speak for 15 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of joint Q&A.

Providing a Push: Five Ways Academic Librarians Can Encourage Faculty to go Open
Steven Bell, Temple University

Librarians are typically perceived as academic support professionals who wait to be asked to take a role in a new campus initiative. But owing to the library's campus neutrality and connections with the disciplines, is often the case that academic librarians are well suited to adopt a leadership role in advancing reforms in scholarship and publishing. Academic librarians can also adopt more aggressive strategies to proactively promote OER to faculty. Academic librarians can apply their experience in promoting the value of open access to their communities to an OER initiative. In this presentation, attendees will be introduced to five actions academic librarians can take to introduce faculty to the benefits of adopting OER in their courses. These approaches will include projects that incentivize faculty to use OER, bringing OER advocates to campus to promote the benefits, creating internal support communities, and organizing campus events to promote the value of shifting to openness in higher education.

Library Piloted OER Adoption: From Flight to Foundation - Transforming OER from Concept to Concrete
John Schoppert, Columbia Gorge Community College

Libraries are a central component of any campus, but are often overlooked by all they serve. Yet libraries are a unique catalyst for change. Because libraries are at the intersection of student instruction, faculty support, and administrative duties, they are perfectly situated for taking OER initiatives from an idea to a sustainable framework. In this session, the director of the Columbia Gorge Community College library will show how the CGCC library moved from an initiative of OER adoption to building a concrete, workable plan that includes student involvement, faculty adoption, bookstore concerns, administration acceptance, and foundation funding support. What were the pitfalls along the way? What can be avoided? How do you create a working program? How many signatures do you need? This session will also include advice on engaging faculty about OER advocacy and creating a sustainable OER culture institution-wide.

Leading from the Library: The Power of Academic Libraries in OER Advocacy
Ann Agee & Christina Mune, San Jose State University

The mission of the university library has always been to provide access to quality information resources. Additionally, academic librarians are expected to understand fair use and copyright policies, and are often called upon to provide advice on the legal use of materials. This heritage places university librarians in a unique position to reach out to faculty and promote open educational resources for classroom use. This session explores how librarians at one campus have embraced their heritage and this challenge by implementing multiple strategies to provide and advocate for the use of OER as a replacement for textbooks in the classroom. Strategies include grants for OER authorship and adoption, partnerships with eReader vendors, behind-the-scenes work to match OER with existing courses, and novel faculty recognition events. Learn what worked, what did not work, and how future tactics are being adapted. Participants will come away with multiple potential strategies for assisting faculty in the adoption of OER as an alternative to the textbook.

Moderators
MB

Marilyn Billings

Scholarly Communication & Special Initiatives Libr, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Speakers
avatar for Ann Agee

Ann Agee

Academic Liaison Librarian, San Jose State University
Since 2012, I have been a coordinator of the Affordable Learning Solutions (ALS) campaign at San Jose State University (SJSU). ALS is a California State University initiative designed to encourage faculty to adopt low-cost classroom materials to replace expensive textbooks. These alternatives include online course readers, open e-textbooks, open courseware, and other digital resources. In this position, I have organized workshops, webinars, grant... Read More →
avatar for Steven J. Bell

Steven J. Bell

Associate University Librarian, Temple University
I enjoy exploring the intersection of academic librarianship and higher education. I'm passionate about exploring how we design better library experiences for community members - and the ways we can better integrate the academic library into the teaching and learning that happens at our institutions. Follow me at /blendedlib or my Library Journal Academic Newswire columns http://lj.libraryjournal.com/category/opinion/steven-bell/ and... Read More →
avatar for Christina Mune

Christina Mune

Digital Initiatives Librarian, San Jose State University
I'm the digital initiatives librarian at San Jose State University (SJSU). As a coordinator of SJSU's Affordable Learning Solutions I promote open access and open educational resources as replacements for expensive textbooks and course materials. I'm interested in creating engaging digital experiences that enhance teaching and learning, both in the library and the classroom - at no cost to students!
avatar for John Schoppert

John Schoppert

Director of Library Services, Columbia Gore Community College
I have been a musician, a cook, a baker, a bookseller, and a bookstore owner; all of these professions laid the foundation for teamwork, community building, and outreach. Now, as the Library Director at Columbia Gorge Community College (CGCC), I'm at the center of change brought about by the emergence of the OER movement. In collaboration with faculty, staff, and administration, I've help CGCC build and implement an OER pilot program that... Read More →


Wednesday November 19, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm
Crystal Ballroom

11:30am

OER: Its sheer adaptable nature lends itself perfectly to district to district collaboration and adoption.
No matter how enthusiastic superintendents, district technology directors, librarians, and principals may be about open educational resources (OER) and blended learning, the success of making the transition from traditional textbooks to OER is completely dependent upon the willingness of the individual teachers to embrace making the change. The most important aspect of building and promoting broad adoption of OER is making that transition as seamless as possible for faculty.

Paving a smooth pathway for OER adoption means accommodating all hardware options, Wi-Fi limitations, various states of flux schools may be experiencing with regard to their technology as well as accommodating variations in faculty tech savvy. Making adoption more feasible means educating teachers on just what OER is, where to find high quality OER, and how they can implement it in to their classrooms. This means making sure teachers understand the various copyright licensing options if they want to use their own materials. It means creating venues for teachers to collaborate with other teachers within their schools, districts, and states. It means understanding how find common core state standard aligned materials that correspond to their curriculum.

We have found that encouraging teacher collaboration as well as cross-district collaboration among OER users, and non-users, to come join in and listen, helps to build the "OER momentum".

In Staten Island, New York we are facilitating teachers across the district to come together by subject and grade to create courses, which will then be approved by the curriculum managers and superintendent. These courses will be fully common core aligned and adhere to their specific curriculums/syllabi yet the OER will still be malleable for the teachers to reconfigure and add additional materials. When one teacher finds a great resource or implementation strategy he or she can share it. Other teachers can decide if they want to use it.

Providing communication and collaboration opportunities for teachers and curriculum managers helps to create a comfort level for teachers that the OER is not only robust and of high quality but also has the support of their superiors. This in turn gives educators the freedom to comfortably use these highly adaptable materials to create customizable courses that accommodate the unique learning makeup of their individual classrooms. With teachers more aware than ever that
students are not one size fits all, this is an especially invaluable feature of OER.

We will share the knowledge we have gained from creating and using OER courseware on various devices in schools in Atlanta, GA, Amarillo, TX, Burlington, MA, Staten Island, NY, Charleston, SC and elsewhere, including specific OER materials, the pros and cons of going textbook-free, the challenges of implementing a 1:1 tablet program with real-life school infrastructure and how to keep the momentum of OER adoption rolling.

Speakers
avatar for Meg Patterson

Meg Patterson

Director of Content and Research, Net Texts
avatar for Katherine Quinn-Shea

Katherine Quinn-Shea

Director of Marketing and Client Relations, Net Texts


Wednesday November 19, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm
Virginia Ballroom

1:15pm

Open Pedagogy to Solicit Student Voice
Use open licensing, OER, and your knowledge of open content to encourage student voice on the importance of open adoption. Participants in this session will hear about, and hopefully design, assignments where students use CC licensed work to advocate for open textbook adoption.

Speakers
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OER Project Director, Tacoma Community College
Librarian, Administrator | I am the OER Project Director at Tacoma Community College and I believe that adopting, adapting and accessing OER empowers faculty, students and administrations to grow educational opportunities. I've been a user, a pusher, a creator and a teacher of OER. (From the College Open Textbooks Community)


Wednesday November 19, 2014 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Richmond

1:15pm

1:15pm

Understanding the interplay between open culture, institutional structure and academic agency in lecturers' contribution and non-contribution of Open Educational Resources: A social realist approach

The contribution and use of OER are enabled on a global level by technology, open licences, open standards in metadata, donor funding and government policy. Institutionally OER contribution is enabled by repositories, clear intellectual property guidelines, donor and/or institutional funding, support teams and services, and policy that gives academics institutional guidelines and recognition or reward for their contributions. The long term sustainability and global reach of the OER movement and other open initiatives rests firmly on the willingness of individual academics to share and use OER. Individual contributions and engagement with OER form the foundation of this movement which is built on the altruistic principle of sharing.

This paper will present the stories of four academics from UCT, one who is sharing and using OER, one who is sharing but not using, one who is not sharing but using and one who is not sharing and not using. Interviews with these academics reveal that there is a complex interplay between the global and institutional culture, institutional culture and individual or personal concerns in enabling or constraining the sharing of materials.

The social realism of Margaret Archer (dates) explores the power of the agent (academic in this case) to decide on their course of action related to their personal concerns.

This paper will present the early findings of a bigger project that hopes to provide a model of the interplay between Open culture, institutional structures and agency. It seeks to explain theoretically why some academics share and others do not. Sharing or not sharing seems to be a matter of personal choice and those who have made the decision not to share may see some of its merits but will still remained closed and are unlikely to share even when presented with grants and other forms of institutional support.

The interviews with these individuals revealed their life histories and personal concerns and understanding these has revealed that these academics share because the act of sharing fits into their broader life concerns. Enablers and constraints in their contexts are subverted in order to achieve their life concerns and neither rewards nor policy are seen as constraints. Those who are not sharing are unlikely to share materials as they have other concerns such improving their classroom practice and developing their students.



Speakers
G

Glenda

Lecturer, University of Cape Town
Why academics choose to share or not share their teaching materials as OER. The quality in OER debate. OER and the Library. OER and Open access.


Wednesday November 19, 2014 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Roanoke

1:15pm

Libraries & OER Publishing: Models That Work
This panel will combine three presentations that discuss how libraries are successfully involved in reviewing, publishing and disseminating OER. Each presenter will speak for 15 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of joint Q&A.

Open textbook publishing at Oregon State University: A partnership among the Libraries, Press, and Extended Campus in support of OSU’s Open Access values and land grant mission
Shan Sutton & Faye A. Chadwell, Oregon State University

At Oregon State University, the Libraries, Press, and Extended Campus units have developed a partnership to publish open textbooks by OSU faculty. Phase one of the initiative provides financial and technical support for the creation of four open textbooks in 2014-2015 that will include extensive multimedia content created by Extended Campus’s Open Educational Resources department. These works will also go through the OSU Press’s standard peer-review and editorial processes. This presentation will discuss how these partnerships were developed, and how open textbook publishing connects to broader institutional commitments to Open Access and OSU’s land grant mission. It will demonstrate how academic libraries can leverage collaborations with campus partners to establish themselves as leaders in Open Educational Resources at their universities.

Library service and advocacy in the publishing and use of OERs and Open Textbooks at SUNY
Cyril Oberlander & Kate Pitcher, SUNY Geneseo; Mark McBride, Monroe Community College

Open SUNY Textbooks (http://www.opensuny.org) is a multi-college program with SUNY faculty & libraries publishing open textbooks & promoting OER use. The program started as an innovative publishing program with key strategies including collaboration across SUNY and libraries, rapid prototype processes and services. Pilot 1 has published 5 of the 15 it selected for publication in 2014, and the second pilot has selected 15 more for publication in 2015. The first pilot received 38 proposals, and the second pilot received 46. The publishing program includes peer review, copy editing, and some instructional design services. This proof of concept is building our awareness and capacity to publish open textbooks, and in the last 9 months, Open SUNY Textbooks has had over 12.3K new viewers, with almost 20% visits from outside the US. This presentation provides a brief summary of the program, lessons learned and next steps to significantly expand the program and adoption of OERs.

Working with the Tools at Hand: Harnessing Library Expertise to Support the Creation of High-Quality Open Educational Resources
William Cross & Brendan O’Connell, North Carolina State University

The creation of OERs on campus requires academics to develop expertise in fields such as copyright, coordinating peer review, licensing, technology, and a host of other areas that have traditionally been in the domain of publishers, rather than academic authors. Campus libraries can be a surprising source of untapped expertise in many of these areas. Based on this expertise, and on their role as the hub for campus collaboration, campus libraries are a natural space to centralize OER efforts. This presentation describes the experience of one academic library that leveraged our expertise to launch a successful OER project by empowering creators with support in the areas described above. Led by a scholarly communication librarian and a committee of stakeholders across the Libraries, North Carolina State University launched an OER program in the spring of 2014. This program, built on the success of our 2010 Open Physics Textbook (http://bit.ly/1nakMH1), offers faculty members grant funding to support the development of alternative textbooks and educational materials that save money for students and empower faculty to make pedagogically-tailored teaching tools.

Speakers
avatar for William Cross

William Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship, North Carolina State University
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Will earned an M.A. in Technology & Communication, a J.D. in Law, and an M.S.L.S. in Library Science. Before joining the Copyright and Digital... Read More →
avatar for Mark McBride

Mark McBride

Director of Libraries, Monroe Community College
avatar for Brendan O'Connell

Brendan O'Connell

Instructional Technology Librarian, Smith College Libraries
I am Instructional Technology Librarian at Smith College Libraries, where I contribute to a variety of emerging projects. I am acutely interested in what academic libraries mean in the liberal arts context. | | Before this, I was a Library Fellow at North Carolina State University Libraries, where I contributed to launching the NCSU Libraries Alt-Textbook Project , designing the D.H. Hill Library Makerspace, and collaborating with faculty on... Read More →
avatar for Cyril Oberlander

Cyril Oberlander

Director, Milne Library, SUNY College at Geneseo
Cyril Oberlander is the Director of Milne Library at the SUNY College at Geneseo since April, 2012, and was previously the Interim Director since January 2011, and before that the Associate Director of Milne Library since January 2008.  Prior to that, he was the Director of Interlibrary Services at the University of Virginia Library 2005-2008; and Head of Interlibrary Loan at Portland State University from 1996-2005; and before that served... Read More →
avatar for Kate Pitcher

Kate Pitcher

Library Director, SUNY Geneseo and Open SUNY Textbooks
Kate Pitcher is Head of Technical Services & Collection Development at the State University of New York (SUNY) College at Geneseo, where she is also a member of the library’s publishing team and chair of the scholarly communications team. At SUNY Geneseo, she worked in reference, instruction, government documents and as Web Development Librarian before her appointment as Head of Technical Services. Technical Services is a seven person... Read More →
SS

Shan Sutton

Associate University Librarian for Research & Scholarly Communication, Oregon State University
Librarian


Wednesday November 19, 2014 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Crystal Ballroom

1:45pm

Using OER to Fuel Collaboration
Through the creation, adoption, and promotion of open education resources in our region the community and technical colleges of Pierce County, Washington have developed a network of devoted open education practitioners. Participants in this session will hear accounts about how our open education community has allowed for more professional development, increased scholarly opportunities, and better instructional experiences for our students. We will also hear accounts from administrators about how the principles of open education and collegial cooperation have strengthened our institutions.

Speakers
PV

Phil Venditti

Clover Park Technical College
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OER Project Director, Tacoma Community College
Librarian, Administrator | I am the OER Project Director at Tacoma Community College and I believe that adopting, adapting and accessing OER empowers faculty, students and administrations to grow educational opportunities. I've been a user, a pusher, a creator and a teacher of OER. (From the College Open Textbooks Community)


Wednesday November 19, 2014 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Richmond

1:45pm

A Review of Research on the Perceptions, Influence, and Cost-Savings of OER: Looking Back and Looking Forward
Increasing textbooks costs, coupled with general rising costs of education have led some teachers to experiment with OER alternatives to textbooks. At the same time, the vast majority of educational contexts are not using OER. Perhaps one of the constraints to a broader adoption of OER is a lack of peer-reviewed research on the influence of OER. This presentation synthesizes the results of eight different peer-reviewed studies that examine (1) the perceptions students and instructors of OER that replaced traditional textbooks (2) the potential influence of OER on student learning outcomes, and (3) the cost-savings resulting from OER. I will also discuss potential paths forward in expanding the pool of academic peer reviewed research on (1) the perceptions students and instructors have of OER, (2) the potential influence of OER on student learning outcomes, and (3) the cost-savings resulting from OER.

Speakers
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Professor, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.


Wednesday November 19, 2014 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Virginia Ballroom

1:45pm

Libraries & OER Publishing: Models That Work Cont'd
This panel will combine three presentations that discuss how libraries are successfully involved in reviewing, publishing and disseminating OER. Each presenter will speak for 15 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of joint Q&A.

Open textbook publishing at Oregon State University: A partnership among the Libraries, Press, and Extended Campus in support of OSU’s Open Access values and land grant mission
Shan Sutton & Faye A. Chadwell, Oregon State University

At Oregon State University, the Libraries, Press, and Extended Campus units have developed a partnership to publish open textbooks by OSU faculty. Phase one of the initiative provides financial and technical support for the creation of four open textbooks in 2014-2015 that will include extensive multimedia content created by Extended Campus’s Open Educational Resources department. These works will also go through the OSU Press’s standard peer-review and editorial processes. This presentation will discuss how these partnerships were developed, and how open textbook publishing connects to broader institutional commitments to Open Access and OSU’s land grant mission. It will demonstrate how academic libraries can leverage collaborations with campus partners to establish themselves as leaders in Open Educational Resources at their universities.

Library service and advocacy in the publishing and use of OERs and Open Textbooks at SUNY
Cyril Oberlander & Kate Pitcher, SUNY Geneseo; Mark McBride, Monroe Community College

Open SUNY Textbooks (http://www.opensuny.org) is a multi-college program with SUNY faculty & libraries publishing open textbooks & promoting OER use. The program started as an innovative publishing program with key strategies including collaboration across SUNY and libraries, rapid prototype processes and services. Pilot 1 has published 5 of the 15 it selected for publication in 2014, and the second pilot has selected 15 more for publication in 2015. The first pilot received 38 proposals, and the second pilot received 46. The publishing program includes peer review, copy editing, and some instructional design services. This proof of concept is building our awareness and capacity to publish open textbooks, and in the last 9 months, Open SUNY Textbooks has had over 12.3K new viewers, with almost 20% visits from outside the US. This presentation provides a brief summary of the program, lessons learned and next steps to significantly expand the program and adoption of OERs.

Working with the Tools at Hand: Harnessing Library Expertise to Support the Creation of High-Quality Open Educational Resources
William Cross & Brendan O’Connell, North Carolina State University

The creation of OERs on campus requires academics to develop expertise in fields such as copyright, coordinating peer review, licensing, technology, and a host of other areas that have traditionally been in the domain of publishers, rather than academic authors. Campus libraries can be a surprising source of untapped expertise in many of these areas. Based on this expertise, and on their role as the hub for campus collaboration, campus libraries are a natural space to centralize OER efforts. This presentation describes the experience of one academic library that leveraged our expertise to launch a successful OER project by empowering creators with support in the areas described above. Led by a scholarly communication librarian and a committee of stakeholders across the Libraries, North Carolina State University launched an OER program in the spring of 2014. This program, built on the success of our 2010 Open Physics Textbook (http://bit.ly/1nakMH1), offers faculty members grant funding to support the development of alternative textbooks and educational materials that save money for students and empower faculty to make pedagogically-tailored teaching tools.

Speakers
avatar for William Cross

William Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship, North Carolina State University
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Will earned an M.A. in Technology & Communication, a J.D. in Law, and an M.S.L.S. in Library Science. Before joining the Copyright and Digital... Read More →
avatar for Mark McBride

Mark McBride

Director of Libraries, Monroe Community College
avatar for Brendan O'Connell

Brendan O'Connell

Instructional Technology Librarian, Smith College Libraries
I am Instructional Technology Librarian at Smith College Libraries, where I contribute to a variety of emerging projects. I am acutely interested in what academic libraries mean in the liberal arts context. | | Before this, I was a Library Fellow at North Carolina State University Libraries, where I contributed to launching the NCSU Libraries Alt-Textbook Project , designing the D.H. Hill Library Makerspace, and collaborating with faculty on... Read More →
avatar for Cyril Oberlander

Cyril Oberlander

Director, Milne Library, SUNY College at Geneseo
Cyril Oberlander is the Director of Milne Library at the SUNY College at Geneseo since April, 2012, and was previously the Interim Director since January 2011, and before that the Associate Director of Milne Library since January 2008.  Prior to that, he was the Director of Interlibrary Services at the University of Virginia Library 2005-2008; and Head of Interlibrary Loan at Portland State University from 1996-2005; and before that served... Read More →
avatar for Kate Pitcher

Kate Pitcher

Library Director, SUNY Geneseo and Open SUNY Textbooks
Kate Pitcher is Head of Technical Services & Collection Development at the State University of New York (SUNY) College at Geneseo, where she is also a member of the library’s publishing team and chair of the scholarly communications team. At SUNY Geneseo, she worked in reference, instruction, government documents and as Web Development Librarian before her appointment as Head of Technical Services. Technical Services is a seven person... Read More →
SS

Shan Sutton

Associate University Librarian for Research & Scholarly Communication, Oregon State University
Librarian


Wednesday November 19, 2014 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Crystal Ballroom

1:45pm

Open source tools for remixing, managing, integrating, and using OER
Lumen Learning is developing a range of open source tools for creating, remixing, managing, integrating, and using OERs. Come learn how to make Wordpress + Pressbooks speak LTI, manage sitewide licensing and attribution, and more.

Speakers

Wednesday November 19, 2014 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Roanoke

2:30pm

Removing 'unfreedoms' through OER use in India's teacher education system
Open Ed 2013 featured an early report on the OER Research Hub collaboration with the TESS-India OER for teacher education project. A year on, research findings from the collaboration are available, covering both the challenges of localising OER for use in international development and the impact of OER on educators' practice. This paper reports those findings, showing how TESS-India is helping to remove what the economist Amartya Sen (1999:xii) refers to as "unfreedoms", for example inadequate education and access to knowledge.

An initial baseline study explored Indian teacher educators' and trainee teachers' views on the challenges they face and the ways OER might ameliorate those challenges. The first research phase, reported in this paper, then studied the ways in which TESS-India's learning materials were localised to meet the needs of end-users within India's education system. OER localisation can include changing the language, pedagogy, content, style, imagery, cultural and geographical references featured in resources. The TESS-India OER localisation covers all these areas and involves adapting resources to be effective in several culturally and linguistically diverse Indian states.

The research focused on workshops held in three Indian states in early 2014. Interviews with workshop participants and facilitators, together with document analysis, gave a basis for addressing three main questions likely to be of wider interest:

(1) What are the challenges of localising OER?
(2) In what ways does the context in which localisation occurs, and the perceptions of the people doing the localisation, affect the process?
(3) How can communities of users best be supported when localising OER?

It was found that localisers' experience, cultural perspective and teaching preferences can greatly shape the OER localisation process and require careful navigation by the host institution. The research findings indicate both that localisation workshops should be longer and that they should be repeated when localisers have had time to reflect on the process. It is argued that bringing localisers together again in this way could work well in terms of long-term sustainability, helping to build a community of people who will adapt and create new OER in the future. A comparison with the UK OU-led TESSA project highlights an apparent dynamic between institutional control of the localisation process, localiser freedom and the level of openness in the process. This paper presents a possible model representing the dynamic.

A second phase of the TESS-India research is currently investigating the impact of the TESS-India OER on the ground, in terms of changes in teacher-educators' and trainee teachers' pedagogical and reflective practices, and standards of learning and teaching in India's schools. Emergent findings are also reported in the paper. This second phase of the research will also explore the overarching question of whether the use of OER can result in more equitable access to education and, more broadly, can contribute to the removal of unfreedoms "that leave people with little choice and little opportunity of exercising their reasoned agency" (Sen, 1999, p. xii).

References
Sen, A. 1999. Development As Freedom. Oxford: Oxford University Press

Speakers
avatar for Leigh-Anne Perryman

Leigh-Anne Perryman

Fellow, OER Research Hub, The Open University, UK
I'm passionate about open education, about social justice, about redressing the imbalance between the world's most and least privileged people, about teaching and learning, about... well, meet me at Open Ed 2014 to find out more...


Wednesday November 19, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Richmond

2:30pm

Research on OER for Development (ROER4D) in the Global South Project
Enabled by the ubiquity of the Internet, alternative intellectual property mechanisms such as Creative Commons, the evolving practice of adding metadata to resources and the growing "open" movement, the emergence of open educational resources (OER) has been hailed as a potentially fruitful response to some of the key challenges faced by education in the Global South.

While some research is emerging on the use and impact of OER in addressing these pressing educational challenges, most of this research is being undertaken in the Global North (Allen & Seaman 2012; Carson, Kanchanaraksa, Gooding, Mulder & Schuwer 2012).

Research on the efficacy of OER in the Global South is embryonic and primarily focused on specific projects, for example the Teacher Education in Sub-Saharan Africa (TESSA) project (Wolfenden, Buckler & Keraro 2012), the Health OER Inter-Institutional Project (Harley 2011) and the OER project at the University of Cape Town (Hodgkinson-Williams, Paskevicius, Cox, Shaikh, Czerniewicz & Lee-Pan 2013). A recently published study on OER in Asia has yielded research on the extent and practice of OER use in higher education in Indonesia (Daryono & Belawati 2013), Malaysia (Abeywardena, Dhanarajan & Lim 2013), Pakistan (Malik 2013), the Philippines (Arinto & Cantada 2013) amongst others. With respect to Latin America, Torres notes that OER is still in its early stages, but that the OportUnidad project plans to provide a "comprehensive set of guidelines on pedagogical approaches, technological solutions, organizational frameworks and procedures, institutional business models and cooperative models that are relevant to the development of OER initiatives" (2013:86).

Recent critiques of OER (Knox 2013a, 2013b) suggest that more robust OER research is required to move beyond celebratory rhetoric and establish "if the provision of open educational resources (OER) can realistically overcome the educational gap and foster educational justice" (Richter & McPherson 2012: 201). A stronger evidence base on OER would allow governments in the Global South to move beyond a rhetoric based on appealing financial and moral claims to evidence-based educational policies which effectively address the challenges faced by post-secondary education.

The Research on OER for Development (ROER4D) in the Global South Project was launched on the 27 August 2013 with the ambitious aims to (1) build an empirical knowledge base on the use and impact of OER in education; (2) develop the capacity of OER researchers; (3); build a network of OER scholars; and (4) curate and communicate research to inform education policy and practice.

This paper will address the specific strategies that the ROER4D project has undertaken so far to enhance the research capacity of 34 researchers in the ROER4D network which spans 11 countries at the moment, speaking at least 11 languages and located across 16 time zones. Specific attention will be paid to the face-to-face and virtual strategies to enhance research capacity, ways to operationalize the commitment to open research throughout the entire cycle of the research process, the creation of open data and visualization strategies, communication and evaluation strategies.

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams

Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams

Associate Professor, University of Cape Town
Research on OER in the Global South (ROER4D) project | Open Research | Open Data


Wednesday November 19, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Roanoke

2:30pm

OER in Western Canada
Canada's three western provinces signed an agreement in Spring 2014 to implement OER. This session reports on OER challenges/opportunities of the collaboration and the successes and problems incurred by the three initiatives. British Columbia, led by BCCampus, started the OER initiatives by implementing a program to build 40 (and now 60) first and second year post-secondary course etextbooks as OER. Athabasca University and eCampus Alberta followed up with an OER workshop in Edmonton shortly after. Alberta Ministry of Innovation and Advanced Education representatives then attended an OER meeting held in Vancouver with representatives from Washington and California. This year, Saskatchewan has also expressed a commitment to support OER. The province has agreed with the others to join with the other two western provinces to facilitate cooperation among the participants in sharing and encouraging the use of best practices in OER, fostering greater collaboration using technology and gaining an understanding of key issues and trends in OER among post-secondary institutions. Several institutions and organizations in Western Canada are members of the OER Univeritas (OERu) initiative. These include two consortia: BCcampus and eCampus Alberta; three universities: Athabasca University, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Thompson Rivers University; and a Community College: Portage College.

Speakers
avatar for Rory McGreal

Rory McGreal

Professor, Athabasca University
I am the UNESCO/Commonwealth of Learning/International Council for Open and Distance Education Chair in Open Educational Resources and the director of TEKRI at Athabasca University


Wednesday November 19, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Virginia Ballroom

2:30pm

OER & Professional Development in Libraries
This panel will combine three presentations about OER in the context of professional development at libraries, including the emerging role of the “OER librarian” and important partnerships to be forged on campus. Each presenter will speak for 15 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of joint Q&A.


Getting in front of the Inevitable: Year 2 of an Open Ed Program
Dana Ospina & Sarah Faye Cohen, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

What does it mean to take the energy, creativity, productivity, and strategies of the Open Ed community and apply them to a specific institutional setting? How do you handle pitfalls? Who are campus partners? What issues feel inevitable in your campus culture? How do you go from the idea to the operational? This presentation will share our process over the past year to answer these, and other questions in order to propel our library-designed and directed open education program at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. We will offer our vision and the specific strategies we have employed to establish a sustainable open education program at Kennedy Library (@REKLibrary). These strategies range from raising open resources’ visibility in library discovery tools; to targeting outreach to students, faculty, and staff; to gaining traction among library colleagues who aren’t familiar with Open. We have considered at great length the particularities and climate of our campus and have worked to introduce Open in a way that resonates productively. Importantly, we will reflect upon the challenges we have faced, challenges we imagine other libraries initiating programs without an existing, established university mandate for Open may also face as they embark on their own programs.

The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful: My First Year as an OER Coordinator
Stacy Zemke, University of Oklahoma

The rising cost of higher education and, more specifically, the costs associated with content resources, have become increasing concerns for universities. In an effort to address these costs for its students, The University of Oklahoma Libraries created the position of OER Coordinator in 2013. This position was created to design and implement a campus wide OER initiative that would encourage both the use and creation of open resources. In this session, we will review the first year of this implementation project. We will address specific initiatives — alternative textbook adoption, OER creation, campus partnerships, and student-focused outreach — and will also discuss how this new role interacts with more traditional library liaisons. Finally, we will address the importance of successful partnerships in development a sustainable and scalable OER program at a large university.

What are Faculty Actually Doing? Exploring Current Practice and Opportunities at Virginia Tech
Anita Walz, Virginia Tech

This presentation is based on themes emerging from a Library planned & hosted panel discussion in Spring 2014 featuring three Virginia Tech and Radford University faculty members. Pre-panel research reveals a range of faculty efforts to locate appropriate learning materials for use in instruction. While some of this includes adoption of custom textbooks, interests in discontinuing use of textbooks, faculty-textbook authoring, and use of multimedia in learning, several faculty have independently initiated development of open educational resources (some of which are open-source and open access), but all of which go beyond the standard “textbook.” These resources are tech savvy, high-quality, relevant, and usable resources for student learning. This session will present findings from the panel planning phase, the hosted panel, and subsequent research intended to identify the needs of instructional faculty, and opportunities for OER program development through the Virginia Tech Libraries and partner entities at Virginia Tech.

Moderators
avatar for Kristi Jensen

Kristi Jensen

eLearning Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries
Kristi Jensen is the Program Development Lead for the University of Minnesota Libraries eLearning Initiative. She has also served as the Research and Learning Department Director for Social Sciences and Professional Programs, the Head of the John R. Borchert Map Library, and as the Physics and Astronomy librarian. Kristi has worked on a wide range of technology-based projects during her career, including the implementation of the Libraries... Read More →

Speakers
SC

Sarah Cohen

Associate University Librarian, California Polytechnic State University
avatar for Anita Walz

Anita Walz

Scholarly Communications Librarian, Virginia Tech
Anita Walz is the Open Education, Copyright & Scholarly Communications Librarian at the University Libraries, Virginia Tech. In this role, she leads library exploration and initiatives related to open education, OER, and online learning; she serves as a library liaison to the Legal studies, Economics, and Mathematics Departments at Virginia Tech and manages several active collaborations with the University’s learning technologies and... Read More →
avatar for Stacy Zemke

Stacy Zemke

OER Coordinator, University of Oklahoma Libraries
Stacy Zemke is the Open Educational Resources (OER) Coordinator for the OU Libraries, and an adjunct instructor for the Schoolof Library and Information Studies. She has been studying the use of OER by faculty and students since 2004. She was born andraised in Norman, leaving long enough to get two Art History degrees in Boulder, then returning to earn her MS in KnowledgeManagement from OU. Stacy has spent most of her working life in Oklahoma... Read More →


Wednesday November 19, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Crystal Ballroom

3:00pm

A Grassroots Approach to Supporting OER Literacy Development with Rural Teachers
This presentation outlines our unique approach in developing open educational resource literacies with rural teachers across the state of Idaho. While methods of OER induction have often tended to have a top-down approach led by the university or state, our center will offer four free summer institutes focused on empowering K-12 educators to become content creators as well as consumers of open educational resources. Empowering educators to become creators of their own content becomes especially important when taking into consideration the push for Common Core standards. Our goal is to help teachers create their own curriculum adapted to local contexts while still meeting Common Core standards. Educators creating their own open resources will not only be more cost efficient, but will also allow for educators to implement texts that only include information essential to their curriculum and region, rather than using only portions of a monolithic, externally adopted text.

At the time of our presentation, all four summer workshops will have been completed and qualitative data based on the institutes will have been collected and analyzed to determine effective processes and barriers to supporting OER literacy development. In this presentation, we aim to share our process and experiences with our summer institutes, our findings, and how these workshops will shape the opportunities our educational institutions offer in the future. More precisely, we would like participants to walk away understanding the structure of these institutes and how that structure changed based on the feedback and outcomes of previous sessions. Additionally, we would like to share qualitative data collected on what it is like from a teacher's perspective to undergo the process of becoming an open educator. Finally, we would like to outline our future goals of understanding the impact of the implementation of open educational resources, including the difficulties or ease of implementing such materials and the influence the materials have in teachers' classrooms.

Speakers
avatar for Cassidy Hall

Cassidy Hall

Director and Assistant Professor, University of Idaho Doceo Center for Innovation + Learning
I assist university faculty, pre-service teachers at the university, and k12 teachers around the state with integrating technologies in their classrooms. For k12 teachers, this support is in the form of professional development and often pd credit. I also experiment with many technologies to test out educational applications. | You can access my presentation at: | bit.ly/BuildingBridges16
avatar for Royce Kimmons

Royce Kimmons

Assistant Professor & Director, University of Idaho


Wednesday November 19, 2014 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Richmond

3:00pm

How can open scholarship address academia's lack of impact on the ground?
Massive Open Online Courses have often been labeled as "experiments" and promoted as approaches to help us understand teaching and learning at scale (Rodriguez, 2012). Early empirical results, however, are unsurprising and largely predictable (Reich 2014). Despite the number of academic disciplines closely associated with designing and studying interventions to improve teaching and learning (instructional design, learning sciences, cognitive psychology, etc.), the empirical lessons arising out of these fields have generally been disregarded. While a number of educational technology companies appear to disregard the knowledge that academia has amassed, part of the failure to communicate between the two communities lies on practices and attitudes inherent to academia. In this presentation, we will identify a range of scholarly failures and explain how open scholarship and associated practices can contribute to the diffusion of research results into the design of emerging learning environments.

In particular, we argue that designers and teachers outside of higher education institutions are unable to access the knowledge created by education researchers and educational technology scholars. Lack of access to that knowledge comes in many forms. In academic publishing, research published in closed journals limits access to knowledge which could have been used by practitioners and designers. Furthermore, educational technology research is often of limited use to practitioners. For example, it fails to make linkages to practice and translate findings into applied knowledge. These problems are reinforced by adherence to impact factors as singular metrics evaluating academic work (West & Rich, 2012) and tenure and promotion policies that value journal impact factors, journal prestige, and publishing with discipline-specific journals. While we (academics) advance our disciplines through significant insights about teaching and learning, we have had limited impact on practice partly as a result of publishing in journals that are predominantly read and understood by colleagues within our own discipline (Selwyn, 2012). These practices are reinforced by institutional policies and practices that discourage scholars from engaging in innovative scholarship that is often construed as "time away from work more highly rewarded during promotion, tenure, and merit review" (Foster et al., 2009, p. 906). Existing reward structures reinforce knowledge hoarding leading to the field of education being hidden from public view. An increasing number of scholars are questioning the value of publishing in traditional peer-review journals, and as noted by Wineburg (2013), academics should "not fool ourselves. Confusing impact factor with real-world impact may enhance our annual reviews, but - in the long term - may lead to our own extinction." This proposal puts forth suggestions to improve communication between all stakeholders (education scholars, MOOC developers, practitioners) grounded on open scholarship and open access practices.

Foster, K. M., Bergin, K. B., Mckenna, A. F., Millard, D. L., Perez, L. C., Prival, J. T., – Hamos, J. E. (2010). Partnerships for STEM Education. Science, 329, 906?907.

Reich J. (2014). Big Data MOOC Research Breakthrough: Learning Activities Lead to Achievement. Blog post. Retrieved on April 24, 2014 from http://bit.ly/1jshwHa

Selwyn, N. (2012). Bursting out of the "ed-tech" bubble. Learning, Media and Technology, 37(4), 331-334.

West, R. E., & Rich, P. J. (2012). Rigor, impact and prestige: A proposed framework for evaluating scholarly publications. Innovative Higher Education,37(5), 359-371.

Wineburg, S. (2013). Choosing Real-World Impact over Impact Factor. The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Speakers
avatar for George Veletsianos

George Veletsianos

Canada Research Chair - Associate Professor, Royal Roads University
open scholarship, social media, emerging technologies, emerging pedagogies, networked participatory scholarship, learners’, educators’, and scholars’ practices and experiences in emerging online settings (e.g., social networks, social media, and open learning environments).


Wednesday November 19, 2014 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Virginia Ballroom

3:00pm

OER & Professional Development in Libraries Cont'd
This panel will combine three presentations about OER in the context of professional development at libraries, including the emerging role of the “OER librarian” and important partnerships to be forged on campus. Each presenter will speak for 15 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of joint Q&A.


Getting in front of the Inevitable: Year 2 of an Open Ed Program
Dana Ospina & Sarah Faye Cohen, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

What does it mean to take the energy, creativity, productivity, and strategies of the Open Ed community and apply them to a specific institutional setting? How do you handle pitfalls? Who are campus partners? What issues feel inevitable in your campus culture? How do you go from the idea to the operational? This presentation will share our process over the past year to answer these, and other questions in order to propel our library-designed and directed open education program at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. We will offer our vision and the specific strategies we have employed to establish a sustainable open education program at Kennedy Library (@REKLibrary). These strategies range from raising open resources’ visibility in library discovery tools; to targeting outreach to students, faculty, and staff; to gaining traction among library colleagues who aren’t familiar with Open. We have considered at great length the particularities and climate of our campus and have worked to introduce Open in a way that resonates productively. Importantly, we will reflect upon the challenges we have faced, challenges we imagine other libraries initiating programs without an existing, established university mandate for Open may also face as they embark on their own programs.

The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful: My First Year as an OER Coordinator
Stacy Zemke, University of Oklahoma

The rising cost of higher education and, more specifically, the costs associated with content resources, have become increasing concerns for universities. In an effort to address these costs for its students, The University of Oklahoma Libraries created the position of OER Coordinator in 2013. This position was created to design and implement a campus wide OER initiative that would encourage both the use and creation of open resources. In this session, we will review the first year of this implementation project. We will address specific initiatives — alternative textbook adoption, OER creation, campus partnerships, and student-focused outreach — and will also discuss how this new role interacts with more traditional library liaisons. Finally, we will address the importance of successful partnerships in development a sustainable and scalable OER program at a large university.

What are Faculty Actually Doing? Exploring Current Practice and Opportunities at Virginia Tech
Anita Walz, Virginia Tech

This presentation is based on themes emerging from a Library planned & hosted panel discussion in Spring 2014 featuring three Virginia Tech and Radford University faculty members. Pre-panel research reveals a range of faculty efforts to locate appropriate learning materials for use in instruction. While some of this includes adoption of custom textbooks, interests in discontinuing use of textbooks, faculty-textbook authoring, and use of multimedia in learning, several faculty have independently initiated development of open educational resources (some of which are open-source and open access), but all of which go beyond the standard “textbook.” These resources are tech savvy, high-quality, relevant, and usable resources for student learning. This session will present findings from the panel planning phase, the hosted panel, and subsequent research intended to identify the needs of instructional faculty, and opportunities for OER program development through the Virginia Tech Libraries and partner entities at Virginia Tech.

Moderators
avatar for Kristi Jensen

Kristi Jensen

eLearning Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries
Kristi Jensen is the Program Development Lead for the University of Minnesota Libraries eLearning Initiative. She has also served as the Research and Learning Department Director for Social Sciences and Professional Programs, the Head of the John R. Borchert Map Library, and as the Physics and Astronomy librarian. Kristi has worked on a wide range of technology-based projects during her career, including the implementation of the Libraries... Read More →

Speakers
SC

Sarah Cohen

Associate University Librarian, California Polytechnic State University
avatar for Anita Walz

Anita Walz

Scholarly Communications Librarian, Virginia Tech
Anita Walz is the Open Education, Copyright & Scholarly Communications Librarian at the University Libraries, Virginia Tech. In this role, she leads library exploration and initiatives related to open education, OER, and online learning; she serves as a library liaison to the Legal studies, Economics, and Mathematics Departments at Virginia Tech and manages several active collaborations with the University’s learning technologies and... Read More →
avatar for Stacy Zemke

Stacy Zemke

OER Coordinator, University of Oklahoma Libraries
Stacy Zemke is the Open Educational Resources (OER) Coordinator for the OU Libraries, and an adjunct instructor for the Schoolof Library and Information Studies. She has been studying the use of OER by faculty and students since 2004. She was born andraised in Norman, leaving long enough to get two Art History degrees in Boulder, then returning to earn her MS in KnowledgeManagement from OU. Stacy has spent most of her working life in Oklahoma... Read More →


Wednesday November 19, 2014 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Crystal Ballroom

3:00pm

Towards a Reference Model for Open Education
Attention for open and online higher education in the Netherlands has grown tremendously in the last decade. Programs and initiatives were initiated on institutional level, supra-institutional level and on national level.

On institutional level open courseware, weblectures, and short video clips on specific subjects were published under an open license. The OER-program (see: http://www.surf.nl/en/themes/learning-and-testing/open-educational-resources/index.html) initiated by SURF, the collaborative ICT organisation for Dutch higher education and research, is an example of an initiative on supra-institutional level. This OER-program aimed at collecting, disseminating and sharing knowledge and best practices on OER on behalf of all institutions for higher education in the Netherlands. On national level, the Dutch Ministry of Education initiated and financed the Wikiwijs program, an open, internet-based platform aimed at finding, sharing, and developing open educational resources (http://openserviceblog.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/110815-wikiwijs-program-plan-2011-2013-def.pdf). The rise of the Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC), starting in 2012, which also gained a lot of attention in the Netherlands, resulted in increased attention for open and online education at the level of the Board of Directors of Dutch universities.

All these initiatives have led to a vast amount of information on OER: research papers, white papers, an OER Toolkit, (conference) presentations, master classes, seminars, webinars are few of the formats used to disseminate the available information. SURF maintains a website (in Dutch) to curate this information (http://www.surf.nl/kennis-en-innovative/kennisbank). More and more it became apparent though that the main actors in this area, the teachers, felt hardly called upon. A gap between the information available (in particular its level of abstraction) and the practical usefulness for teachers was felt.

To tackle this problem, the SURF Special Interest Group Open Education (https://www.surfspace.nl/sig/5-open-education/) started developing a reference model for open education, targeted to all stakeholders, with an initial focus on teachers. The aim for this model is:
* to categorize, label, and organize the available information,
* demanded by a teacher to start searching/finding Open Education and OER related products and resources, to start reusing, designing and developing, and, last but not least, publishing Open Education and OER related products or getting informed and involved in other means of open and online education developments
* at the right level of detail for the user.

The reference model will be used to offer Open Education and OER related information, based on a profile of the user. The profile of the user indicates the level of expertise in the field of open education (e.g. experienced or novice) and the role of the user (e.g. teacher, member of a curriculum development group, instructional/learner product designer, multi-media support specialist, OER-expert etc.). Depending on the specific profiles, information will be accessible to the user, whereby it can occur that the user is referred to an expert for more information or support.

In the presentation we will present the initial version of the reference model and the first experiences in using the model for access to a portal with Open Education and OER related information.

Speakers
avatar for Bert Frissen

Bert Frissen

Sr Consultant Learning & ICT / Digital Services (Avans Learning and InnovationCentre, LIC), Avans University
avatar for Pierre Gorissen

Pierre Gorissen

Senior Consultant / Researcher, Fontys Hogescholen
I am a senior consultant and researcher at the Educational Development and Research department of Fontys University. Responsible for a diverse range of IT and Educational related projects, with a main focus on Open Education / Web 2.0 / Weblectures / Media Literacy / eBooks / Social Software.
RS

Robert Schuwer

Professor, Open Universiteit/Fontys University of Applied Sciences


Wednesday November 19, 2014 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Roanoke

3:45pm

Revise and Remix: Tackling The Hard Part Of OER's 'Four R's'
This session is aimed at course developers and college faculty charged with the task of taking existing courses and converting them to OER. The presenters will share what they have learned after working for two years on tackling the challenges of finding appropriate materials, making adaptations, and creating new content to fill in gaps, while facing constraints of working within existing programs, syllabi, course requirements, and internal expectations and approval processes.

Speakers
avatar for Virginia Coleman-Prisco

Virginia Coleman-Prisco

Mercy College
      | “Remember, Ginger Rogers did everything Fred Astaire did, but she did it backwards and in high heels.”- Faith Whittlesley
HM

Howard Miller

Chair, Dept. of Secondary Education, Mercy College
After nearly 40 years in the field of education, I remain passionate about improving the quality of teaching and learning, and certainly OER has opened new and exciting opportunities. Here's a link to an article I co-authored on the impact of OER at Mercy College--http://tinyurl.com/n6kru53 Also, we are looking for proposals for articles on OER for an upcoming issue of the Global Education Review. Contact me at hmiller@mercy.edu | | Beyond... Read More →
ES

Emily Seibert

Assistant Professor and Academic Coordinator, Mercy College
I teach and coordinate the Critical Inquiry and Junior Seminar courses at Mercy College. These courses reinforce and assess skills such as critical thinking, reading, writing, speech, and information literacy. I love creating competency-based OER's and incorporating learning modules, digital stories, ePortfolios, and service-learning into curriculum. I also love old television shows, rock concerts, and saving stray cats.


Wednesday November 19, 2014 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Richmond

3:45pm

Mapping OER: Prototypes and challenges
In this panel, we will discuss the mapping and visual display of OER initiatives in light of three ongoing projects aimed at indexing OER from around the world. Mapping OER involves many challenges, including the finding of machine-readable data, translating and inputting content, the selection and development of software architectures and metadata schemes, identifying what constitutes (or not) an OER-related initiative, cooperative editing processes for quality assurance, and sustainability. Additionally, mapping initiatives are often part of a suit of visualization options which can be used with the gather data, which includes graphs, heat maps, timelines and other types of tools.

Here, we will present the working prototype of three ongoing projects, which have grappled with some of these issues, with unique outcomes and learning experiences.

The MIRA project, a federated, multilingual, open-source mapping initiative was aimed at identifying the most important OER-related initiatives in Latin America focused on the K-12 level. Each initiative was investigated in order to provide extensive descriptive and searchable information. We collaboratively created a Dublin-Core aligned metadata scheme to allow for facile data exchange. As part of the project a series of tools and systems aimed at collaborative mapping was examined, as well as existing OER-maps. These data will be shared during the presentation.

The eMUNDUS is a European project to promote collaboration among international partners in Russia, Indonesia, Canada, Brazil, Mexico, Belgium, UK and Italy. The mapping component of this project is to chart the use of OER, MOOCs and Virtual Mobility around the world. A world map has been designed built on an open database that will include the Higher Education Institutions, consortia and collaborations involved in the three areas.

Finally a working prototype of the hbz OER World Map will be presented which aims at maximum data connectivity and reusability using an approach, which combines Linked Open Data (LOD) with an open API. One of the underlying assumptions of the project is, that the OER World Map data models an important backbone of the OER ecosystem and therefore should be easily reused by other applications, which could be developed in the future. Extending the platform will maximize the added value of the data, which increases the chance that the system will be able to deliver high quality data on a sustainable basis.

All three projects demonstrate the synergy that unfolds if elements of open source, open data and open educational resources are combined. In this panel, we aim not only to present the current work, but also to gather feedback and insight from the participants as to how to improve and extend the reach of mapping initiatives from the mezzo (institutional) to micro (resource) level.

Speakers
avatar for Tel Amiel

Tel Amiel

Researcher, UNICAMP
UNESCO Chair in Open Education at Unicamp. Researchers on education, new media, technology and public schooling at NIED/Unicamp.
avatar for Priscila Gonsales

Priscila Gonsales

executive-director, Educadigital Institute
Ashoka’s fellow, I have a Master in Education, Family and Technology at Salamanca University (UPSA-Spain), a post-graduation in Communication Process Management at São Paulo University (USP-Brazil) and has graduated in Journalism at Cásper Líbero (Brazil). I've been working with Education and Technology for more than 14 years, creating and coordinating different projects in Brazil. At Cenpec (Center of Education, Culture and Community Action... Read More →
avatar for Rory McGreal

Rory McGreal

Professor, Athabasca University
I am the UNESCO/Commonwealth of Learning/International Council for Open and Distance Education Chair in Open Educational Resources and the director of TEKRI at Athabasca University
avatar for Jan Neumann

Jan Neumann

Head of Legal Affairs and Organisation, Project Manager of the OER World Map Project, North Rhine-Westphalian Library Service Centre
I`m looking at OER from an systems thinking point of view. Special fields of interest are OER policy making and OER in libraries. I'm the project manager of the hbz OER World Map project and blog about OER on www.oersys.org.


Wednesday November 19, 2014 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Roanoke

3:45pm

Supporting the adoption of Open Educational Practices in Australian higher education through capacity-building
This paper will present and discuss a small research project funded by the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching. The project aims to design, develop and test a free, open and online professional development course focussed on supporting curriculum design in Higher Education. The course will have a specific aim to develop the capacity of academics in Australia to adopt and incorporate Open Educational Resources (OER) and Open Educational Practices (OEP) into curriculum development for more effective and efficient learning and teaching across the Australian higher education sector. The initiative will address an identified gap between awareness of OEP and implementation of OEP, particularly the production, adaptation and use of OER to support the design of innovative, engaging and agile curriculum. This course will be a micro Open Online Course (mOOC) where "micro" refers to a sub-component of a full course. mOOCs (hereafter micro-courses) are a different concept than Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), which tend to be courses/units or part of a unit purposely developed to be delivered to thousands of learners across the world. The large majority of MOOCs do not provide clear articulations or pathways towards degrees. The micro-course developed in this project will lead to micro credentials, which are recognition of learning on a smaller scale than traditional university provision courses. The advantage in this case is that the micro course would be focussed on curriculum design and therefore able to provide just in time development for academic staff involved in curriculum design and renewal, but could also be assessed and validated for articulation into larger courses for credit. Such recognition of learning in a small batch, is perfect for a model of course design which brings together learning from across many partners and beyond and can be readily adapted and incorporated into professional development programs of different universities.

Despite recent federal investments and important developments in OER and OEP, the Australian higher education sector lags behind other countries in these endeavours. The US, UK and some other European countries have regulatory frameworks and institutional and national support, including funding, that are widely available to academics and educators in general. Considering the evolving pace and demonstrable impact of OER and OEP on the international higher education sector, the need for further professional development and capacity-building to facilitate the adoption of OER and OEP in Australia is critical. In fact, previous research on OER and OEP have identified a lack of appropriate academic staff professional development programs available for academics as one of the main reasons for the limited adoption of OER and OEP in Australian universities (Bossu, Bull & Brown, 2012). This project offers a strategic approach to bridge this gap and make a significant contribution to the adoption of OER and OEP in learning and teaching in higher education in Australia and beyond.

Bossu, C., Bull, D., & Brown, M. (2012). Opening up Down Under: the role of open educational resources in promoting social inclusion in Australia. Distance Education, 33(2), 151?164. doi: 10.1080/01587919.2012.692050

Speakers
CB

Carina Bossu

University of Tasmania, Australia


Wednesday November 19, 2014 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Virginia Ballroom

3:45pm

The Future of Libraries & OER: Reflections, Connections & Plans
In this closing panel for the OpenEd Libraries & OER track, veteran OER advocates from the library community will engage the audience in a discussion about the future of libraries and the open education movement. The panel will seek to be as interactive as possible, giving audience members a chance to share their thoughts and experiences relating to OER.

The discussion will address three main themes:

• Reflections on the presentations, ideas and discussions that came up earlier in the day
• How libraries can create and support connections within and between institutions working on OER
• What resources, information and programming would best support the library community’s expanded involvement in the OER movement

Moderators
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e

Speakers
avatar for Steven J. Bell

Steven J. Bell

Associate University Librarian, Temple University
I enjoy exploring the intersection of academic librarianship and higher education. I'm passionate about exploring how we design better library experiences for community members - and the ways we can better integrate the academic library into the teaching and learning that happens at our institutions. Follow me at /blendedlib or my Library Journal Academic Newswire columns http://lj.libraryjournal.com/category/opinion/steven-bell/ and... Read More →
MB

Marilyn Billings

Scholarly Communication & Special Initiatives Libr, University of Massachusetts Amherst
avatar for Sharon Farb, PhD, JD

Sharon Farb, PhD, JD

AUL, UCLA Library
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OER Project Director, Tacoma Community College
Librarian, Administrator | I am the OER Project Director at Tacoma Community College and I believe that adopting, adapting and accessing OER empowers faculty, students and administrations to grow educational opportunities. I've been a user, a pusher, a creator and a teacher of OER. (From the College Open Textbooks Community)
avatar for Stacy Zemke

Stacy Zemke

OER Coordinator, University of Oklahoma Libraries
Stacy Zemke is the Open Educational Resources (OER) Coordinator for the OU Libraries, and an adjunct instructor for the Schoolof Library and Information Studies. She has been studying the use of OER by faculty and students since 2004. She was born andraised in Norman, leaving long enough to get two Art History degrees in Boulder, then returning to earn her MS in KnowledgeManagement from OU. Stacy has spent most of her working life in Oklahoma... Read More →


Wednesday November 19, 2014 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Crystal Ballroom

4:15pm

Open Online Course Design and Development: Challenges and Promises
Open online course design and development is now part of the higher education landscape of some institutions. The presenters were involved in an Open Educational Resource universitas (OERu) redevelopment project that involved the adaptation and customization of an existing introductory open art course so that a new open online course could be made available to OERu partners and any interested learners globally. ART 100: Art Appreciation and Techniques was repurposed from open educational resources (OER) made available by the Saylor Foundation and has been redesigned with the intent of making it more flexible for reuse, redistribution, revision and remixing for different users and contexts. A big part of the course redevelopment project was to pilot the use of MediaWiki as both a development and a publishing platform for open distributed learning. Technical barriers and other challenges made the project more difficult than originally anticipated. Väljataga, T., Põldoja, H., & Laanpere, M. (2011, p. 67) point out that, "although open online course design solves many educational problems and challenges, at the same time it also creates new ones." In this workshop, we will discuss several critical technological, and other, considerations and challenges of designing and developing a course for open online delivery, using OER. We will also outline some of the promises of such a venture.

Speakers
avatar for Irwin DeVries

Irwin DeVries

Interim Associate Vice-President, Open Learning, Thompson Rivers University, Open Learning
TRU
avatar for Gail Morong

Gail Morong

Instructional designer, Thompson Rivers University
Gail has been an educator for over 33 years with experience in learning design, curriculum development and delivery, distance education and online learning, open educational resources, undergraduate and graduate collaborative program design, educational technology and educational leadership.


Wednesday November 19, 2014 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Richmond

4:15pm

A multi-institutional study of the impact of open textbook adoption on the learning outcomes of post-secondary students
 The purpose of this study is to analyze whether the adoption of no-cost open digital textbooks significantly predicts students’ completion of courses, achievement, and enrollment intensity during and after semesters in which OER were used. This study utilizes a quantitative quasi-experimental design with propensity score matched groups to examine differences in outcomes between students that used OER and those that did not. The demographics of the initial sample of 16,727 included 4,909 students in the treatment condition with a pool of 11,818 in the control condition. There were statistically significant differences between groups, all favoring students utilizing OER. 

Speakers
avatar for Lane Fischer

Lane Fischer

Department Chair, Counseling Psychology & Special Ed, BYU
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Professor, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Wednesday November 19, 2014 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Virginia Ballroom

4:15pm

Skills Mapping and Analytics for OER
The Open Learning Initiative (OLI) is an open educational resources initiative that seeks to build learning environments based on principles derived from learning science research into how people learn. One of the main principles is that goal-directed practice and targeted feedback are critical to learning. Goal-directed practice involves working toward a specific level of performance and continually monitoring performance relative to clearly defined goals. When these goals are explicitly communicated to students, they support students' purposeful practice and help them monitor their progress.

In order to create online learning environments that provide goal-directed practice, OLI courses start with the development of a skills map. The skills map is authored by design teams who identify learning objectives and the skills that compose those objectives. Learning objectives specify what students will be able to do or know at the end of a section of content. A skill identifies the discrete concept, or knowledge component, embedded within the learning objective. Each learning objective comprises one or more skills. Interactive activities and quizzes are created to assess students' learning related to the various skills identified in the skills map.

The creation of skills maps serves a number of purposes, including assisting in the iterative course improvement process; measuring, validating and improving the model of student learning that underlies each course; and offering information necessary to support learning scientists in making use of OLI open datasets for continued research. One of the best known uses of these skills maps, however, is to support learning analytics for instructors. In this context, the objective of skill mapping in OLI is to determine the probability that a given student has learned a given skill. Individual skills are treated as mathematically independent variables.

In the current version of the model used in OLI courses, student learning is modeled using a Bayesian hierarchical statistical model with the latent variables of interest, students' learning states, becoming more accurate as more data is accrued about performance on a given skill. This learning model is used to drive dashboard-style displays for both instructors and students. For instructors, the display gives a high-level overview of how students are performing on the learning objectives for each module in the course. Before going into class, instructors can see quickly the concepts students are grasping and the concepts with which they are struggling. This enables instructors to spend their time with students addressing areas where students are having trouble, as opposed to covering material that students have been able to master on their own. For students, the display shows level of mastery for each learning objective, and also allows students to view activities associated with each objective in order to provide an easy way to get more practice on a given objective.

We will give an overview of the skills map process, discuss the analytics reports and dashboard-style displays that skills mapping enables, review next steps for future improvements, and discuss implications for how skills mapping can drive student learning and iterative course improvement in OER.

Speakers
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University


Wednesday November 19, 2014 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Roanoke

4:15pm

The Future of Libraries & OER: Reflections, Connections & Plans Cont'd
In this closing panel for the OpenEd Libraries & OER track, veteran OER advocates from the library community will engage the audience in a discussion about the future of libraries and the open education movement. The panel will seek to be as interactive as possible, giving audience members a chance to share their thoughts and experiences relating to OER.

The discussion will address three main themes:

• Reflections on the presentations, ideas and discussions that came up earlier in the day
• How libraries can create and support connections within and between institutions working on OER
• What resources, information and programming would best support the library community’s expanded involvement in the OER movement

Moderators
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e

Speakers
avatar for Steven J. Bell

Steven J. Bell

Associate University Librarian, Temple University
I enjoy exploring the intersection of academic librarianship and higher education. I'm passionate about exploring how we design better library experiences for community members - and the ways we can better integrate the academic library into the teaching and learning that happens at our institutions. Follow me at /blendedlib or my Library Journal Academic Newswire columns http://lj.libraryjournal.com/category/opinion/steven-bell/ and... Read More →
MB

Marilyn Billings

Scholarly Communication & Special Initiatives Libr, University of Massachusetts Amherst
avatar for Sharon Farb, PhD, JD

Sharon Farb, PhD, JD

AUL, UCLA Library
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OER Project Director, Tacoma Community College
Librarian, Administrator | I am the OER Project Director at Tacoma Community College and I believe that adopting, adapting and accessing OER empowers faculty, students and administrations to grow educational opportunities. I've been a user, a pusher, a creator and a teacher of OER. (From the College Open Textbooks Community)
avatar for Stacy Zemke

Stacy Zemke

OER Coordinator, University of Oklahoma Libraries
Stacy Zemke is the Open Educational Resources (OER) Coordinator for the OU Libraries, and an adjunct instructor for the Schoolof Library and Information Studies. She has been studying the use of OER by faculty and students since 2004. She was born andraised in Norman, leaving long enough to get two Art History degrees in Boulder, then returning to earn her MS in KnowledgeManagement from OU. Stacy has spent most of her working life in Oklahoma... Read More →


Wednesday November 19, 2014 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Crystal Ballroom

6:00pm

Reception - Sponsored by Courier
Wednesday November 19, 2014 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Virginia Ballroom
 
Thursday, November 20
 

7:30am

Registration
Thursday November 20, 2014 7:30am - 8:00am
Virginia Ballroom Foyer

8:15am

Mini-Keynote
Speakers

Thursday November 20, 2014 8:15am - 8:30am
Virginia Ballroom

8:30am

Keynote - Heather Joseph
Speakers
HJ

Heather Joseph

Executive Director, Sparc/ARL
| Heather Joseph has served as the Executive Director of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) since 2005. In that capacity, she works to support broadening access to the results of scholarly research through enabling open access publishing, archiving and policies on a local, national and international level. Ms. Joseph is also the convener of the Alliance for Taxpayer Access, a coalition of universities, libraries... Read More →


Thursday November 20, 2014 8:30am - 9:30am
Virginia Ballroom

9:30am

Break - Sponsored by Saylor Academy
Thursday November 20, 2014 9:30am - 9:45am
Virginia Ballroom Foyer

9:45am

Adopt, Remix, Create: Meeting University Goals with an Open Textbook Initiative
In Spring 2012, the University of Wisconsin-Madison began a series of pilot projects to learn about and influence e-textbook activity on campus. It was clear that digital formats had the potential to lower costs and provide more flexible ways for instructors to customize content and for students to access and read on the devices of their choice.

During the course of these pilots--all focused on commercial textbook options--campus leaders developed a set of seven guiding principles to inform future e-textbook pilots and initiatives. After three semesters of experimentation and evaluation with commercial e-textbooks, we decided to find out if open textbooks would be a better match to our guiding principles.

In this session, we will describe the development, successes, and challenges of that open textbook pilot. We will examine instructor attitudes, the critical partnership between campus libraries and the academic technology department, and what we've learned so far.

Evaluations from students and instructors participating in the first three e-textbook pilots indicate that publisher-driven solutions do not meet our needs. The price point of commercial e-textbook rentals available to students through online stores (Amazon, Google Play, CourseSmart) are still well above what students say they are willing to pay. In addition, students' vision of an ideal digital textbook is more interactive, customized to their own course, and allow more options for downloading and reading offline than available commercial e-textbooks.

UW-Madison's "eTexts: Adopt, Remix, Create" initiative is intended to encourage a transition away from high cost commercial textbooks and to explore new paradigms for course readings. The pilot supports three different options for instructors. They can adopt an existing open textbook or other OER content (Adopt); replace a traditional textbook with a combination of articles, book excerpts, etc. that are library-licensed, open access, or freely available online (Remix); and/or replace a traditional textbook with instructor-authored content provided for free or at low cost to students (Create).

In January of 2014, the pilot program began providing support to eight courses. Librarians provided research and copyright consultation, instructional designers and academic technologists provided platform and technical support, and participating instructors were given a $1,500 stipend to defray costs associated with their efforts. We will share the outcomes of these eight projects and our plans for future open textbook activity.

Speakers
JJ

James Jonas

UW Madison - MERIT Library
"Labor is prior to, and independent of, capital. Capital is only the fruit of labor, and could never have existed if labor had not first existed. Labor is the superior of capital, and deserves much the higher consideration." - Abraham Lincoln Father, husband, librarian, skeptic, bicyclist, nerd, part-time misanthrope.
CN

Carrie Nelson

University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries


Thursday November 20, 2014 9:45am - 10:15am
Virginia Ballroom

9:45am

The maturing OER ecosystem: partners, expansion, and critical questions
Partnerships are necessary to maintain, improve and broaden adoptions of OER in education. Yet, many open textbook authors consider these models both unsettling when they do not receive royalties and also contrary to the spirit of using open educational resources. How do we solve this dilemma? Join this panel as it shares models for authors, non profit organizations, and for profit corporate collaborations.


The Author Perspective:
Barbara Illowsky is co-author of the newly released Introductory Statistics by OpenStax College, the updated version of the "best seller? Collaborative Statistics in the Connexions collection. She will share how and why she and co-author Susan Dean continue to work with outside companies on developing partnerships, even when "they? earn money but the co-authors earn kudos. Barbara will also discuss the how these partnerships can drive forking of basal content to create high quality OER options.

The "For Profit" Perspective:
Mark Santee is the VP of Product and Marketing for WebAssign, a commercial online homework and assessment application that supports hundreds of textbooks from every major traditional textbook publisher. He will discuss how the support of OER fits into WebAssign's overall publisher partnership model and why OER continues to be a strategic imperative for the organization. Mark will also demonstrate how these types of partnerships can hasten positive disruption by fixing the broken economic model that currently exists in the market.

The "Non Profit" Perspective:
Daniel Williamson, Managing Director OpenStax College, now manages the day-to-day operations of OpenStax College using his extensive experience in academic e-publishing to guide content development, technology integration, and overall project coordination of OpenStax. Daniel shares OpenStax's sustainability goal's that will ensure the continuation of the program beyond grant funding. Daniel will also provide perspective on "open" when fees are involved.

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Illowsky

Barbara Illowsky

Professor, Mathematics & Statistics, De Anza College
Enabling students to achieve their educational goals. | (from the California Post-Secondary Education Commission) - Dr. Barbara Illowsky is a Professor of Mathematics and Statistics at De Anza College in Santa Clara County. She has served as the Project Director for the California Community Colleges Basic Skills Initiative. She was also the first project director for the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources, run by the... Read More →
MS

Mark Santee

VP, Product and Marketing, WebAssign
Mark Santee leads WebAssign’s product management and marketing organizations. His team is responsible for product strategy and planning, as well as corporate and product marketing. | | Mark has worked in the educational publishing industry for more than 15 years. His career began in faculty support and he has contributed in a variety of roles spanning sales, marketing, administration, editorial, and technology. Prior to WebAssign, he... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Williamson

Daniel Williamson

Managing Director, OpenStax
A Rice University graduate and longtime CNX team member, Daniel now manages the day-to-day operations of OpenStax College using his extensive experience in academic e-publishing to guide content development, technology integration, and overall project coordination. He has overseen the creation, editing, and maintenance of a database of nearly 2000 open educational resources accounting for a total online viewership of over 3 million.


Thursday November 20, 2014 9:45am - 10:15am
Crystal Ballroom

9:45am

OER Policy in North America and Europe
The goal of this session is to provide an overview of OER policy in Europe and North America, seen from a comparative perspective.

In Europe, recent policy developments in 2013, focused around the "Opening Up Education" initiative of the European Union, has suddenly made OER one of the cornerstones of educational policy. At the same time, the openness standard set by the EU within the Erasmus+ funding program (with a budget of 14.7 billion euro until 2020) is binding, but weak (without a clear definition of openness of resources). In member states, there is a patchwork of varied approaches. In general, OER-related programs (such as creation of content repositories for teachers) are more common and advanced than policy-based approaches. Finally, across Europe alliances are being formed to offer grassroots support for public policy development. Coalition for Open Education has been active in Poland since 2008. Similar developments have been taking place in the Nordic countries, Macedonia, Romania and Germany.

In North America, a myriad of institutional, state, and national OER policies have emerged over the last decade, from Washington State's publicly funded Open Course Library to the U.S. Department of Labor's $2 billion workforce training grant program. Canada is quickly emerging as an international leader on open textbooks and promoting inter-provincial cooperation in support of OER. The surge in OER policies is largely a response to the rapidly rising cost of textbooks, particularly at the higher education level but also in K-12. Yet, advocates have faced significant barriers to policies and their implementation, including a strong publisher lobby, confusion with MOOCs, and political opposition to government spending.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e
avatar for Alek Tarkowski

Alek Tarkowski

Director, Centrum Cyfrowe / Communia
Director of the Centre, Alek manages projects for a reform of laws and public policies (policy). Co-founder and coordinator of the Creative Commons Poland, he also acts as the European Policy Fellow for the American organization Creative Commons, which leads the project "OER Policies for Europe". Co-founder and now also vice-chairman of the Coalition for Open Education. Actively involved in Communia, the European... Read More →


Thursday November 20, 2014 9:45am - 10:15am
Richmond

9:45am

Changing the global course of learning: Our experience teaching an open, online, formal/informal, bilingual, international, multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional course
In this session we will share our first-hand experiences of developing and offering an experimental open (CC BY SA), online post-secondary course: Open Knowledge: Changing the Course of Global Learning. This course, to be offered in the Fall of 2014, aims to help students of business, education, library and information science and publishing studies increase their understanding of the foundations of open knowledge creation, use, dissemination, and evaluation, to collaborate with learners from other cultures and disciplines, and to work effectively in rapidly changing knowledge environments.

Open Knowledge is a MOOC, in that it is online, follows a traditional course format, and is freely available to anyone interested in participating. However, it will also be simultaneously offered for credit to registered students at the University of British Columbia (Canada), Simon Fraser University (Canada), Stanford University (United States), Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México (Mexico), Fordham University (United States) and Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (Ghana). In this way, the course attempts to reduce the barrier that is typically erected between the classroom and the outside world. Students will be learning in the world, not separated from it. Finally, the course aims to push the boundaries of learner control, requiring learners to define their own learning objectives, to add materials they discover and find interesting to the weekly resource list, and to assess their own learning and progress.

The course not only covers issues of "openness" (open education, open access, open source, open science, open data, open licensing, etc.) in its content, but assembled its course materials from existing OERs, made any new content available under a CC-BY-SA license, and attempts to introduce methods of open pedagogy that encourage self-determined learning and challenge traditional classroom power relationships, including the use of personal learning objectives, student-contributed course materials, weekly student leadership responsibilities, open reflective blogging, the creation and sharing of OERs as major assignments, and self-assessments.

Our presentation will report on the philosophical and logistical challenges of planning, developing, and organizing this kind of experimental, multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional, international, bilingual course. Special attention will be focused on issues related to the bilingual nature of the course and the myriad of legal issues faced in its creation and delivery. We will also describe our experiences working with the students, possibilities for offering the course again, and our plans to openly share our own learning and research findings after the course concludes.

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Maggio

Lauren Maggio

Director of Research and Instruction, Stanford University School of Medicine
Hi - | My name is Lauren and I am a student, librarian, teacher and researcher. I live in Berkeley, California where I love to ride my bike, go to farmers' markets, knit things, go to the theater and read children's books. | | As a PhD student at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and University of Utrecht in the Netherlands, I study health professions education. My research focuses on connecting physicians with... Read More →
avatar for Bozena Mierzejewska

Bozena Mierzejewska

Assistant Professor, Fordham University
avatar for Kevin Stranack

Kevin Stranack

Associate Director, Community Engagement & Learning, Simon Fraser University, Public Knowledge Project
Associate Director for Community Engagement & Learning, Public Knowledge Project at the Simon Fraser University Library.


Thursday November 20, 2014 9:45am - 10:15am
Roanoke

10:15am

'Eyes That Survey the World': the latest data snapshot from OER Research Hub
The true power of comparative research around the impact and use of open educational resources is only just being realised, largely through the work done by the Hewlett-funded OER Research Hub, based at The Open University (UK). Since late 2012 the project has used a combination of surveys, interviews and focus groups to gather data about the use of OER by educators, formal learners and informal learners across the globe. This presentation will focus on the overall picture emerging from the project's survey research, which presently comprises more than 4,972 responses, 62% of whom are informal learners, 14% of whom are formal learners and 24% of whom are educators. Results from more than fifty individual questionnaires have been compiled, including surveys of K12 and Flipped Learning teachers; college educators from the CCCOER consortium; users of iTunesU, OpenLearn, OpenStax, Saylor, Siyavula and YouTube.edu. OER Research Hub also has a general survey which is currently open so it is expected that sample size will grow.

In this presentation the research team will identify patterns in this one of the largest collections of linked survey data about OER. Key questions around OER use and attitudes will be explored with one of the biggest data sets that are available. The emergent picture is thus likely to be of interest to a wide range of OER stakeholders. Areas that will be covered include:

Who is using OER and in what ways?
- 99% of educators have adapted OER to fit their needs; 71% have created OER; 32% have created resources and published them with a CC license.
- 50% of survey respondents are male, 49% female; 35.6% speak a language other than English, and 10% declare themselves to have a disability.

What impact is OER having on teaching?
- While 32% of educators agree or strongly agree that OER use helps them reflect more on the way that they teach, the percentage of those who disagree or strongly disagree increases to 40.5%

How do students enrolled in education programmes use OER?
- For formal students using Saylor materials, the most commonly reported impact was increased motivation to study (46%).

What do we know about use of OER by informal learners?
- 35% of informal learners completing the OpenLearn survey indicated that they were more likely to take a paid-for course as a result of using OpenLearn

Are OER saving money?
- 62% of educators believe that their students have saved money by using OER, and 40% think that their institutions benefit financially.

Are OER improving access to education?
- 16% of OpenLearn users reported a disability, compared with the UK-wide figure of 8% disabled students in higher education.

Audience members are encouraged to share their reactions to the data and reflect on how it compares with their own experiences. OER Research Hub research instruments are available on open license (CC-BY) for anyone who wants to reproduce survey work, and we encourage others to share results back to the overall data set to leverage the power of openness.

Speakers
avatar for Bea de los Arcos

Bea de los Arcos

Research Associate, The Open University
Dr. Beatriz de los Arcos Researcher, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, United Kingdom | Researching the impact of OER on teaching and learning practices with colleagues at the OER Research Hub Project; leading the project's collaboration with educational programs in the K12 sector. |  
avatar for Rob Farrow

Rob Farrow

Research Fellow, The Open University
Research Fellow @openuniversity / Open Education through a philosophical lens / Projects: @oer_hub @gogn_oer @oerworldmap @JIME_journal / Cat: @tailz_of_terror | | Project URLS: | http://oerhub.net/ | https://oerworldmap.org/ | http://go-gn.net/ | http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/
avatar for Leigh-Anne Perryman

Leigh-Anne Perryman

Fellow, OER Research Hub, The Open University, UK
I'm passionate about open education, about social justice, about redressing the imbalance between the world's most and least privileged people, about teaching and learning, about... well, meet me at Open Ed 2014 to find out more...
avatar for Beck Pitt

Beck Pitt

Research Assistant, The Open University
Hi there! I'm a researcher on the Open Education Research Hub and Opening Educational Practices in Scotland (OEPS) project at the Open University (UK). Find out more: http://oerresearchhub.org | | Come and talk to me about all things open and how we (the Hub) could help you!


Thursday November 20, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am
Crystal Ballroom

10:15am

Open Education Breakthrough: Institutions Removing Barriers to Usage
Rapidly expanding institutional awareness is beginning to drive adoption to scale. What are the institutional factors driving this focus on OER? What are the most effective institutional strategies, and how do institutions enhance academic freedom and balance their economic needs with growing OER usage?

Speakers
avatar for David Harris

David Harris

n/a, n/a
David is a graduate of the University of Connecticut and has worked extensively in higher education publishing. During his career David has held a range of leadership positions allowing him to collaborate with the best authors, editorial groups, and media development teams in the industry. Most recently David was the president of WebAssign, the largest independent online homework provider. At OpenStax College David hopes to contribute to the... Read More →
avatar for Jason Pickavance

Jason Pickavance

Director of Educational Initiatives, Salt Lake Community College
I'm currently Director of Educational Initiatives at Salt Lake Community College. My lead initiative is promoting open educational resources. I'm working on creating individual and structural incentives for the adoption of open content by faculty. I'm also pushing the College to think more broadly about open education in the community college context. Before taking becoming Director, I was an Associate Professor in the English Department where I... Read More →
avatar for Kim Thanos

Kim Thanos

CEO, Lumen Learning


Thursday November 20, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am
Virginia Ballroom

10:15am

Openness Paradigm, a necessary reflection for the future education policies in Latin America
Education is the pillar that supports the social and economic development of countries. It is a right recognized by the main international human rights instruments, as well as in the legal systems of Latin American countries. Huge public resources have been aimed at improving national education systems, experiencing some progress but with ample room for further progress.

We know that digital technologies and proposals that have emerged from the open movement (i.e. open education resources -OER, Open Access) contribute to the education improvement, offering new opportunities to address issues such quality, relevance and diversity of education resources, teacher skills, maximizing economic resources, among other. The emergence of ICT, on the other hand, has prompted a wave of state policies and programs that seek to incorporate and use them for the benefit of the teaching and learning processes. Despite good intentions and major efforts of many Latin American governments, the focus has been on addressing coverage, without necessarily being implemented actions that effectively promote appropriation of digital technologies and harness its disruptive capacity.

The Karisma Foundation has been researching on this subject and in March launched the "Public Expenditure on Education in Latin America. Can serve the purposes of the Paris Declaration on OER?" report, where it was mapped the public expenditure reported by some Latin American governments for developing and procuring educational resources for K-12 education. Currently, Karisma is working on a second research that seeks to analyze the way in which such spending occurs at higher education level. The ultimate goal is to offer some recommendation for developing policies that promote and support the OER implementation in national education systems in Latin America.

Therefore, the proposed panel will discuss how public spending for developing and procuring education resources is being managed in Latin America's K-12 and higher education systems. In such discussion, it will be examined strengths and weaknesses of public educational policies, will be showing examples of good practices related to implementation of OER projects, will be looking into alternative models for development of OER, and will be considered the role state, educational institutions, the educational community, civil society and the private sector. To do this, open education experts from the region, who will share their knowledge and concerns in this subject, will form this panel.

Speakers
avatar for Carolina Botero

Carolina Botero

Director, Fundación Karisma
Lawyer and activist. During the last decade I have worked in the promotion and defense of human rights in the Internet. I believe that an open, secure, descentralized, and inclusive Internet is a great tool for citizen participation. @carobotero
avatar for Priscila Gonsales

Priscila Gonsales

executive-director, Educadigital Institute
Ashoka’s fellow, I have a Master in Education, Family and Technology at Salamanca University (UPSA-Spain), a post-graduation in Communication Process Management at São Paulo University (USP-Brazil) and has graduated in Journalism at Cásper Líbero (Brazil). I've been working with Education and Technology for more than 14 years, creating and coordinating different projects in Brazil. At Cenpec (Center of Education, Culture and Community Action... Read More →
avatar for Carolina Rossini

Carolina Rossini

Policy Manager, Facebook
Carolina Rossini is a Brazilian lawyer and policy advocate, working on the impact of the internet on development, human rights, intellectual property and telecommunications law and policy. She works at Facebook on the Global Connectivity Policy Team. Before joining Facebook, Carolina was the Vice President for International Policy and strategy at Public Knowledge, a non-profit that promotes freedom of expression, an open Internet, and access to... Read More →
avatar for Amalia Toledo

Amalia Toledo

Project Coordinator, Fundación Karisma


Thursday November 20, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am
Richmond

10:15am

Open peer review as educational resource
Peer review is an important part of the scientific endeavor: it evaluates the scientific quality of research articles, it helps authors to improve the quality of their papers, and judges the validity of their work. Because it is considered as an indicator of careful scrutiny by peers it is also indispensable when weighing the claims made by the work in question. However, without proper access to these referee reports as scientists in training, young researchers face a daunting task when peer reviewing their first paper. This lack of transparency during the peer review process can lead to a self-perpetuating cycle of vicious refereeing, improper evaluation of science, and publication bias, ultimately affecting funding decisions, research directions and careers.

The availability of open access publications has already aided scientific education at undergraduate and graduate level by providing broad access to scientific literature. Some open access journals are now also making referee reports or correspondence with the editor publicly available. For example, eLife posts editorial decision letters for most of its papers; BMJ Open, all medical journals in the BMC series, Trials, GigaScience, and Biology Direct have all long been publishing reviewer reports once the article is accepted and published; and F1000Research publishes all referee reports and reviewer names alongside each paper as they come in.

The inclusion of referee reports with published articles opens up an important part of the peer review process: Referee reports often summarize the relevance of the paper, and put it in context within a broader field. Aside from benefits to authors and referees, such as reduced bias amongst referees and the ability to take public credit for writing referee reports, inclusion of referee reports with published articles adds to the arsenal of tools available to young scientists as they learn how to conduct peer review themselves – an important step in becoming valuable members of their scientific community.

As peer review is such an important process in assessing the validity of a piece of new research , writing good quality referee reports is one of the most important skills a young scientist can learn, enabling them to play a greater role in their community while developing critical thinking and writing skills. At F1000Research we are working on several projects aimed at improving education about peer review. For example, we've recently partnered with Sense about Science's peer review workshops in the UK and have begun talks with New York University staff and faculty to begin a pilot program to teach graduate students about peer review.

This session will present various examples of open peer review and how they can be used as effective educational tools to teach the next generation of scientists how to properly peer review research papers.

Speakers
avatar for Eva Amsen

Eva Amsen

Outreach Director, F1000Research
avatar for Cesar Berrios-Otero

Cesar Berrios-Otero

Outreach Director, F1000
avatar for Erin McKiernan

Erin McKiernan

Professor, National Autonomous University of Mexico
Erin McKiernan, professor in the Department of Physics at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, is a researcher in experimental and computational biophysics and neurophysiology, and an advocate for open access, open data, and open science. She is also the founder of Why Open Research? (whyopenresearch.org), an educational site for researchers. She blogs at emckiernan.wordpress.com. You can follow her on twitter at @emckiernan13.


Thursday November 20, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am
Roanoke

11:00am

Implementing Open Textbooks in an Online Biology Lab Course
Biology 102L at Humboldt State University is a fully online Human Biology lab course. This presentation will examine the use of open textbooks and OERs for this course, how they were adapted by the instructor, the cost savings to the student and institution, and the reception of the materials by the students. Data will be presented from both online and face-to-face sections of this course. We will also look at some of the innovative strategies employed to meet the learning outcomes of the Human Biology lab.

Speakers
avatar for Geoff Cain

Geoff Cain

Director, Academic Technology, Humboldt State University
I am the Director of Academic Technology at Humboldt State University. I am interested in open education resources, open textbooks, online teaching and learning, course development, and Connectivism.


Thursday November 20, 2014 11:00am - 11:30am
Roanoke

11:00am

The Open Textbook Initiative: Partners and Progress
Textbook costs create a financial burden on college students that can impact their higher education access and academic success. Open textbooks can help alleviate the burden of textbook costs. Open textbooks are full, real textbooks that are licensed to be freely used, edited, and distributed. An increasing number of quality open textbooks are available for faculty to choose from. But adoptions of open textbooks by faculty have come slowly.

During our three years of experience with open textbooks at the University of Minnesota, we discovered several reasons why faculty don't adopt open textbooks, and then found solutions and strategies to help faculty overcome the barriers. From those solutions, the University of Minnesota has developed an initiative to help other institutions overcome those barriers. The initiative includes faculty and staff development models, textbook quality reviews, and a toolkit of resources that are freely available.

Wanting other institutions to benefit from the expertise and successful strategies we developed, we created a toolkit of materials and curricula (Creative Commons licensed of course) that can be used at other institutions to help their faculty adopt open textbooks. We then traveled to several partner institutions to provide faculty development and engagement, and also trained local staff how to continue the work after we leave.

This session will be an update on the initiative. We will discuss the lessons learned as we traveled to other institutions and worked within a number of different environments and contexts. We will provide information about the number of open textbook adoptions resulting from the initiative and the potential savings by students. We will attempt to involve staff from partner institutions to talk about the impact of the initiative on their campuses.

In addition, changes to the University of Minnesota's open textbook library (open.umn.edu) will be presented. After two years, the open textbook library has had 132,000 visits from around the world. Faculty from partner institutions have contributed reviews which help visitors better judge the quality of the materials. During this presentation, we will discuss changes to the open textbook library functionality and collection.

Speakers
avatar for David Ernst

David Ernst

Executive Director, Open Textbook Network
Dr. David Ernst is graduate faculty, Chief Information Officer, and Director of the Center for Open Education in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota. David is also the Executive Director of the Open Textbook Network, which works to improve higher education access, affordability, and academic success for all students through the use of open textbooks. David created and manages the Open Textbook Library... Read More →
avatar for Kristi Jensen

Kristi Jensen

eLearning Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries
Kristi Jensen is the Program Development Lead for the University of Minnesota Libraries eLearning Initiative. She has also served as the Research and Learning Department Director for Social Sciences and Professional Programs, the Head of the John R. Borchert Map Library, and as the Physics and Astronomy librarian. Kristi has worked on a wide range of technology-based projects during her career, including the implementation of the Libraries... Read More →


Thursday November 20, 2014 11:00am - 11:30am
Crystal Ballroom

11:00am

Championing the Cause: Bridging State Policy and Practice in K-12 OER
US states are as different as foreign countries when it comes to education policy, planning and budgets. This talk examines major statewide K-12 OER initiatives and how they came to be. Each state's unique barriers and successes are examined, as is the interplay between policy and practice. The role of the individual OER champion is reviewed as a primary driver in stimulating successful OER policy and implementation.

This research is part of a fellowship-based research study for the OER Research Hub (Open University, UK).

Speakers
avatar for Sara Frank Bristow

Sara Frank Bristow

Founder, Lead Researcher, Salient Research LLC
Sara is an education researcher and consultant in global K-12 and higher education, with an emphasis on blended and online education (policy and practice), OER, and the use of wikis as educational tools. Clients and collaborators include the OER Research Hub (The Open University), the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL), Evergreen Education Group, CompetencyWorks, Wiki Strategies, The University of Mississippi, and KMDI... Read More →


Thursday November 20, 2014 11:00am - 11:30am
Richmond

11:00am

Open Tools for Open Publishing
Announced at OpenEd 2012 in Vancouver, the British Columbia Open Textbook Project has been developing and adapting open textbooks for highly enrolled courses and programs in British Columbia. As part of the project, BCcampus has been actively developing and extending an open publishing platform based on the popular WordPress CMS. PressBooks Textbooks is a WordPress plugin that extends the existing PressBooks plugin and enables the creation, remix and publishing of open textbooks in numerous formats. In this session we'll talk about the features of the plugin, as well as discuss some of the challenges and opportunities building an open source community of developers.

Speakers
avatar for Clint Lalonde

Clint Lalonde

Manager, Educational Technology, BCcampus
Clint Lalonde is an educational technologist and an advocate for the use of open educational resources and open education practices in higher education. Clint has worked in the British Columbia post-secondary system for 20 years, and is currently Manager, Education Technology at BCcampus.
avatar for Brad Payne

Brad Payne

Technical Analyst, BCcampus
Brad Payne is currently the lead developer for the Open Textbook Project whose work focuses on open source software using PHP (LAMP). When not contributing to other developers’ projects on github, he builds his own and invites participation. Through exploiting API’s and with a penchant for design patterns, he helps BCcampus implement new technologies for post-secondary institutions. Prior to his current position at BCcampus, Brad worked in IT... Read More →


Thursday November 20, 2014 11:00am - 11:30am
Virginia Ballroom

11:30am

Merging the original R with the Open 4-Rs - 'wRiting goes OER'
In an effort to scale the use of OER, the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD) has created a strategic initiative, called the Maricopa Millions, with a goal of saving students $5 million in 5 years. A component of this project is an internal grant process, targeting high enrollment courses. Faculty applicants of the grant process are encouraged to submit grant proposals with representatives from multiple MCCCD colleges in the hope that the materials can be used and scaled to multiple colleges. Phase I of the grant process funded the move to OER for English Composition I, English Composition II, and College Preparatory Reading. Support for these faculty was provided through the Maricopa Millions project as well as by campus-based and District-based instructional designers and librarians. In this session, faculty and instructional designers will share the support strategies, pedagogical considerations and the processes used for transforming their courses to open.

Speakers
avatar for Carol  L. Smith

Carol L. Smith

English Faculty, SouthMountain Community College
I teach developmental and first-year composition at South Mountain Community College. Working with students in face-to-face, online, and hybrid /blended environments, I am passionate about topics surrounding e-learning, and open access, rhetoric, linguistics, composition, and best practices for equitable access to and delivery of quality instruction to students. I am also interested in program assessment, reviewing what we do, how we do it... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Young

Lisa Young

Faculty Director, Center for Teaching and Learning, Scottsdale Community College
I serve Scottsdale Community College as the Instructional Design and Educational Technology faculty member. | | I am passionate about helping our students learn whether it be through excellent instructional design, the use of educational technology to resolve and mitigate instructional needs, and/or providing open educational resources to eliminate barriers to access and provide more relevant and useful learning materials


Thursday November 20, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm
Roanoke

11:30am

Supporting OER within the realities of existing campus systems
Often the quickest route to implementation for any new initiative is by leveraging existing systems and processes. For OER, this often means considering what can be accomplished within the confines of an institutional LMS rather than standing up another new IT system. This presentation will cover strategies that you can take to support OER at your institution by leveraging your existing LMS and the implications to supporting reuse, revision, remix, and redistribution (the Four R?s).

Speakers
GK

George Kroner

Enterprise Solutions Architect, University of Maryland University College


Thursday November 20, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm
Crystal Ballroom

11:30am

Higher Education institutions as boosters of a national policy on OER
In January 2014, the Dutch Minister of Education sent a letter to the Dutch Parliament. The letter described the trend towards more open and online education as a promising and inspiring development which she is keen to promote and facilitate. These intentions come with an annual funding commitment of 1 million euro per year for several years. Which road did the Netherlands take in order to secure commitment for a national policy?

Higher education institutions (HEIs) in the Netherlands all participate in SURF, a collaborative ICT organisation. The ensuing cross-institutional initiatives are strong; they are based on trust and reciprocity of knowledge exchange. In this presentation we identify ways in which HEIs can take the initiative to give the development of national policy on OER a boost. We will use the Dutch case study as a model.

We will take a look at the following elements:

- 1. HEIs uniting in a Special Interest Group for Open Education
An important role was taken by the Special Interest Group (SIG) Open Education. The SIG is a community of HEI staff members, working in the various institutions of higher education. The SIG is supported by SURF in terms of organisation. SURF's self-appointed task is to share its knowledge on open education, jointly work on vision building and facilitate development within the individual HEIs. This group publishes a yearly Open Education Trend Report, based on a range of meetings within the community of experts to generate input.

- 2. SURF Open Education Innovation Programme
SURF started its Open Education Innovation Programme in 2011. This programme aims to expand awareness of trends and developments, exchange information about concrete applications, and jointly discuss opportunities and threats around open and online education. For instance, this programme organised a study trip to the US for chairmen of HEI institutions and representatives of the Ministry of Education. This trip gave them a key opportunity to generate a shared vision on OER. Another element of the programme is the SURFacademy, in which HEI professionals transfer knowledge across HEI institutions, both on a basic and advanced level. The SURF programme also co-ordinates the Open Education Week, stimulating the individual HEIs to organise their own activities in open education. And finally, together with the SIG Open Education, they organised tailor-made workshops for HEIs to formulate a vision or policy on open education.

The existence of a cross-institutional cooperation structure that has the support of virtually all HEIs offers many possibilities: it forms a fundament for a solid programme that addresses the needs of and has the support of all HEIs. Based on this case study, we will discuss to what extent other countries can use a similar approach.

We will wrap up the presentation with a brief look to the future: what will be the next step? Is there an inevitable need for a clear policy framework? If so, which role should HEI institutions have in defining its contours' Or should this innovative force be granted space to develop further while we experiment with flexibilisation, life-long learning, hybrid learning and the further improvement of quality of education?

Speakers
avatar for Janina van Hees

Janina van Hees

Project manager open and online education, SURF
RS

Robert Schuwer

Professor, Open Universiteit/Fontys University of Applied Sciences


Thursday November 20, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm
Richmond

11:30am

Open Learning Analytics
The past five years have seen a dramatic growth in interest in the emerging field of Learning Analytics (LA), and particularly in the potential the field holds to address major challenges facing education. However, much of the work in the learning analytics landscape today is closed in nature, small in scale, tool- or software-centric, and relatively disconnected from other LA initiatives. This lack of collaboration, openness, and system integration often leads to fragmentation where learning data cannot be aggregated across different sources, institutions only have the option to implement "closed" systems, and cross disciplinary research opportunities are limited. Beyond the immediate concerns this fragmentation creates for educators and learners, a closed approach dramatically limits our ability to build upon successes, learn from failures and move beyond the "pockets of excellence (and failures)? approach that typifies much of the educational technology landscape.

The potential benefits of openness as a core value within the learning analytics community are numerous. Learning initiatives could be informed by large scale research projects. Open-source software, such as dashboards and analytics engines, could be available free of licensing costs and easily enhanced by others, and OERs could become more personalized to match learners' needs. Open data sets and reproducible papers could rapidly spread understanding of analytical approaches, enabling secondary analysis and comparison across research projects. To realize this future, leaders within the learning analytics, open technologies (software, standards, etc.), open research (open data, open predictive models, etc.) and open learning (OER, MOOCs, etc.) fields have established a "network of practice" aimed at connecting subject matter experts, projects, organizations and companies working in these domains.  As an initial organizing event, these leaders organized an Open Learning Analytics (OLA) Summit directly following the 2014 Learning Analytics and Knowledge (LAK) conference this past March as means to further the goal of establishing "openness' as a core value of the larger learning analytics movement.  Additional details on the Summit and those involved can be found at: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/04/prweb11754343.htm.

This panel session will bring together several thought leaders from the Open Learning Analytics community who participated in the Summit to facilitate an interactive dialog with attendees on the intersection of learning analytics and open learning, open technologies, open data, and open research. The presenters represent a broad range of experience with institutional analytics projects, an open source development consortium, the sharing of open learner data, and academic research on open learning environments. Each presenter will briefly share their perspective on and experience with openness in learning analytics within the context of the larger open education agenda. This will be followed by a moderated panel discussion during which key strategic issues will be discussed and debated. The last 15 minutes will be dedicated to audience Q&A. A Twitter "back channel? will be used to capture comments and questions which panelist will address in follow up. Major themes and possibilities that emerge from the panel will directly inform the ongoing work that began at the OLA Summit.

Speakers
avatar for June Ahn

June Ahn

Assistant Proessor, University of Maryland, College Park
avatar for Josh Baron

Josh Baron

Senior Academic Technology Officer, Marist College
Sakai, learning analytics, openness
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Stian Håklev

Stian Håklev

University of Toronto
PhD in online learning and open educational resources, University of Toronto http://reganmian.net/blog PhD at OISE/University of Toronto in online collaborative learning and Open Educational Resources. Co-founder of Peer2Peer University.


Thursday November 20, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm
Virginia Ballroom

1:15pm

Are Open Educational Resources (OERs) Bringing Paradigm Shift in Higher Education in India?
The availability of open educational resources (OERs) and the concept of open licensing (Creative Commons) have generated considerable interest among the educators and learners. In recent times, there is a significant campaigning of use of open educational resources. Numbers of educational institutes are into development of digital courseware in India. There is growing momentum among higher education institutions to participate in this "open" movement and to contribute in National Repository of Open Educational Resources (NROER) which was launched on August 14, 2013. NROER is a joint venture of India's Department of School Education and Literacy, Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD), and the Central Institute of Educational Technology, National Council of Educational Research and Training. In addition, there is also MHRD funded National Programme on Technology Enhanced Learning (NPTEL) and IGNOU's learning resource repository, e-GyanKosh. Aim of all these initiatives is to provide open access to high quality digital educational materials. Modes of delivering OERs are numerous and ranges from desktops to mobile devices. Against this backdrop, it was imperative to know how educator and learner use OERs and what constraints they face in doing so. This study reports the results obtained from a structured questionnaire given to teachers and students of the University of Delhi. The questionnaire was based on the following variables: necessity, acquaintance, utilization, and limitations. The paper additionally considers the implications of these findings for practicing OERs and how practical and relevant it is to use OERs. The study clearly shows that OERs have a great potential to bring about Revolution in education in India provided these resources are really open in terms of cost, use and adaptation.

Speakers
RT

Ravi Toteja

Associate Professor, Acharya Narendra Dev College, University of Delhi


Thursday November 20, 2014 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Roanoke

1:15pm

Desirable Disruption: Replicate the Z-Degree
Few community colleges are pushing the envelope to expose the full impact of OER on teaching and learning. While there are numerous OER efforts underway, this session will provide a synopsis of key components in scaling an OER effort from a single course to an entire degree. The Z-Degree is amplifying the power of OER to improve student success not only through increased access and affordability, but also by enhanced teaching efficiency and effectiveness. The foundation of the Z-Degree is the ability to focus, analyze, augment and evolve course materials directly aligned with a courses learning outcomes. This session will share how the Z-Degree model can be replicated in a way that is scalable, encompassing a single course or an entire degree, while remaining flexible enough to engage both full-time and adjunct Faculty in online, hybrid, or traditional courses.

Speakers
DD

Daniel DeMarte

Vice President for Academic Affairs & CAO, Tidewater Community College
avatar for Linda  S. Williams

Linda S. Williams

Professor, Tidewater Community College
Business Professor Linda Williams has become the face of TCC’s Textbook Free Degree. She’s been featured in countless articles and television interviews about the cutting edge program that enables TCC business students to earn an entire degree while spending zero funds for textbooks. | | “It is amazing to be the first accredited institution of higher learning to offer a fully OER-based degree,” said Williams. “While we see the... Read More →


Thursday November 20, 2014 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Virginia Ballroom

1:15pm

How not to promote open sharing of educational materials at a university
In February, 2014, the University of British Columbia passed Policy 81, requiring the open sharing of many teaching and learning resources with the university and other UBC faculty, unless one opts out. Upon a first read Policy 81 appears to be a small step forward in the promotion of open educational resources; what has happened, however, has been a significant step backwards. In this session I will discuss the policy and its aftermath as a story of: (a) how not to approach promoting OER at an institutional level, (b) what the reaction of many faculty members to Policy 81 says about the attitudes of at least some higher education faculty members about open sharing of educational materials, and (c) what might be better methods of promoting the creation of OER at a North American university such as UBC.

Policy 81 states that if UBC instructors make their teaching materials available for use by others, "UBC may, through its Faculties, Departments and individual Instructors, use, revise, and allow other UBC Instructors to use and revise the Teaching Materials to facilitate ongoing offerings of Credit Courses' unless the instructor restricts the use of these materials." (http://universitycounsel.ubc.ca/files/2014/02/policy81.pdf) Ostensibly, the purpose of this policy is, in part, to allow for the revision and reuse of educational materials in a streamlined fashion, such as those shared directly between persons, deposited in university department collections, or used by instructors in a course with a curriculum and materials created in the past by others. Faculty members can choose to opt out of sharing their teaching materials by putting a notice on each item they wish to restrict, or by registering entire courses on a central university registry saying that none of the materials for those courses may be revised or reused by anyone else at the university for for-credit courses.

The main problems with this policy are that the university designated it as an "opt out" rather than "opt in" system, and that it covers materials not automatically assumed to be shared for the purpose of reuse and revision, such as those placed on public course websites.

Anecdotal evidence shows a significant amount of anger about this policy, and many have reacted by asserting on their teaching materials that they may not be reused and revised by others - the very opposite of promoting more open sharing. During the summer of 2014 I will be doing a survey of UBC teaching staff to get a better sense of faculty reactions to the policy and the arguments people have for not wanting their educational materials to be used by others at the university (as well as whether they would be open to sharing them beyond the university, and if not, why not). Through this, and a workshop I am doing on open education at UBC in June 2014, I will try to determine some of the main obstacles to my colleagues openly sharing educational resources, and suggest a more fruitful approach to encouraging them to do so.

Speakers
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching, University of British Columbia-Vancouver
UBC, Philosophy, WordPress, OER


Thursday November 20, 2014 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Richmond

1:15pm

Using open standards to solve everything
There has been a lot of great discussion and development around OER infrastructure this year: a 5th R, Candela, Connexions editor, federated wiki, storage neutral apps, etc. What if you could discover the content you want in Candela, edit it in Connexions, with all its attribution goodness, pull it into your personal wiki for public use, consume it in your LMS for a course this semester, and your students then add it into a section in their own domain? Oh, and your edits were also sent back to Candela for potential merging.

Yeah, you could do this with some copy/pasting, but if all these systems supported open standards, this magic could happen automatically.

We'll discuss how existing standards can solve some of these workflows, and how we can develop new extensions to solve OER-specific problems.

Speakers
avatar for Bracken Mosbacker

Bracken Mosbacker

Software Engineer, Instructure
Talk to me about open standards like LTI and Common Cartridge, and their relation to OER.


Thursday November 20, 2014 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Crystal Ballroom

1:45pm

A Pedagogical Fabric for Open Education
One of the great benefits of OERs is their philosophical alignment with inquiry-based and project-based learning, essential tools in developing critical thinking skills in students. Managing meaningful inquiry-based assignments, however, can be a challenge due to the time-intensity of instructors reviewing written student work.

Typically, critical thinking skills are practiced in three steps: students read or watch materials, they write down their thoughts and then teachers review them. The trouble is that reviewing written assignments is one of the most time-intensive teacher activities. That process is important, of course, for longer more substantive writing projects, but for guiding critical thinking it is just a bottleneck.

With Ponder, we have broken apart the idea generation and the writing, making it possible for a teacher or professor to review each of their hundred-and-fifty students' critical reactions to assigned readings before class every day.

Ponder is also a social platform for students to collaborate and discuss through, and because it is used across subjects from ELA to social studies, STEM content literacy to foreign language, it becomes a cultural fabric for your school. Because it can be leveled from elementary school through graduate school, it is something they can use across grades as they grow older, in study groups and for fun.

Ponder can be used on any text or video that a student can browse to. Though it evolved pedagogically in traditional classrooms here in the US, its flexibility and scalability have made it relevant to a broad array of educational scenarios around the world.

In this session we will review our findings from the efficacy study at the university level this past year, the focus group work we have done around our flipped-video interface this Spring, and best practices from schools and universities around the world using Ponder.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Selkirk

Alex Selkirk

Founder, Ponder


Thursday November 20, 2014 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Roanoke

1:45pm

Kaleidoscope 2.0: An Open Course Design, Development, and Adoption Approach at Cross Institutional Scale
The Kaleidoscope Open Course Initiative brings together colleges that serve predominantly at-risk students to improve student success. The partners use open educational resources and open technologies to create, adopt, and improve collaborative, open course designs.

This panel session of Kaleidoscope faculty will present the impact and results of this innovative OER adoption model with emphasis on strategic issues such as cross-institutional collaboration, community development, and sustainability models.

Speakers
BA

Brent Adrian

Central Community College
avatar for AC Campbell

AC Campbell

Professor, Santa Ana College
Sociology Instructor | Kaleidoscope Faculty Fellow | OER Implemented in Spring 2014 | PhD Purdue University | Masters California State University, Fullerton | U.S. Marine Veteran
avatar for Christie Fierro

Christie Fierro

Instructional Designer & Open Educational Resource, Tacoma Community College
avatar for Amber Gilewski

Amber Gilewski

Associate Professor of Psychology, Tompkins Cortland Community College
Veganism, environmentalism, animal rights, human rights, feminism, social justice, the democratization of education, open content, and comic relief.
RD

Ronda Dorsey Neugebauer

Faculty Success Lead, Lumen Learning
My last 10 years in education have focused on improving at-risk students’ academic success. I'm passionate about collaborating with others to create, experience, and sustain teaching and learning success using OER.
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OER Project Director, Tacoma Community College
Librarian, Administrator | I am the OER Project Director at Tacoma Community College and I believe that adopting, adapting and accessing OER empowers faculty, students and administrations to grow educational opportunities. I've been a user, a pusher, a creator and a teacher of OER. (From the College Open Textbooks Community)


Thursday November 20, 2014 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Virginia Ballroom

1:45pm

OEP at the University of Tasmania: in practice and policy
The University of Tasmania is the only University in the Australian State of Tasmania and has a reputation for learning and research that is international in scope, vision and standards. UTAS has recently endorsed to share the unique expertise of UTAS teachers through openly sharing developed educational resources with the broader academic community and develop further resources through the use of high quality content sourced from experts around the globe through Open Educational Resources (OER).

In 2012 the University of Tasmania stepped into Open Educational Practice (OEP) by leading a national project to develop an OER repository for sharing educational resources among a community of Adaptations Scholars, in Australia and internationally. In 2013 UTAS began testing further environments for the use of OEP including its first MOOC "Understanding Dementia". The MOOC served as an initial endeavour by the University of Tasmania School of Medicine and Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre to develop an open unit with associated OER.

Based upon a substantial literature review and analysis of results from Adapt, Dementia and other projects UTAS developed a technology enhanced learning and teaching White Paper that provided a centrally endorsed strategy for the implementation of sustainable OEP. The paper introduced key purposes for implementing OEP accompanied by a set of enabling principles. This new strategy disaggregates traditional elements of higher education delivery at UTAS and provides a sustainable blended model incorporating open, online and face to face delivery.

This presentation provides an account of the cultural, technical, legal, qualitative, and policy barriers the University of Tasmania has encountered in the development and implementation of OEP through nationally led open education projects. The presentation then continues to describe how open education strategies and using OER have been translated into value propositions for the institution and centrally embedded into evolving practice and policy.

Speakers
avatar for Luke Padgett

Luke Padgett

Manager, Teaching Innovation and Copyright, University of Tasmania
Luke Padgett is the Manager of Teaching Innovation and Copyright with the Tasmanian Institute of Learning and Teaching (TILT) at the University of Tasmania. His work and research primarily focus on Open and Non-traditional approaches to education in higher education, specifically challenges related to learning resources, copyright, intellectual property, licencing and engagement.


Thursday November 20, 2014 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Richmond

1:45pm

The Best of Both Worlds? Transforming OpenCourseWare in the age of interactivity
The strength of OCW has been the widespread sharing of course materials from traditional academic courses at their host institutions. But as the host universities transform their teaching to support blended and "flipped" models, how can OCW transform to support these newer models of teaching and learning?

From it's beginnings, one of the stated goals of MITx has been to enhance campus education at MIT. Since its inception dozens of courses have used the edX platform at MIT for blended learning. The time has come to open campus-based online learning. However, adapting an MITx course -- particularly the MOOC-style interactive assessments -- to OCW presents technical, usability and pedagogical challenges. In this presentation, we will discuss how we addressed these issues for the course 18.05x Introduction to Probability and Statistics.

Speakers
avatar for Brandon Muramatsu

Brandon Muramatsu

Assistant Director, Strategic Education Initiative, MIT
avatar for Peter  Pinch

Peter Pinch

Associate Director, Engineering, MIT Office of Digital Learning
I work for the Office of Digital Learning at MIT, which is at the crossroads of OpenCourseWare, MOOCs and experimental digital learning.


Thursday November 20, 2014 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Crystal Ballroom

2:30pm

K12 OER Collaborative
The K12 OER Collaborative is an initiative led by a small group of states (Utah, Washington, and Idaho are the initial steering committee members) and facilitated by CCSSO. Its objective is to create comprehensive, high-quality open education resources supporting K-12 math and ELA aligned with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). These resources would offer additional choice to local education agencies, significantly reduce expenditures for instructional materials, and would offer much greater flexibility with higher quality digital educational content. This project is not creating a national curriculum and steps are being taken to ensure it will not be perceived in this way.

As part of the transition to the CCSS, over the next few years districts across the country are planning on spending over $8 billion dollars to acquire new CCSS aligned curriculum materials for math and ELA. These textbooks will quickly fall into disrepair and their content will lapse out of date. In addition, much of this spending will be on costly yearly subscription fees for online content which states will only be able to lease (not own). New improvements in technology and online content create the very real potential to offer students dynamic digital content that is organized, searchable, tagged, aligned with standards, and engaging for students. The huge aggregate demand represented by the nationwide need for new materials creates a unique opportunity for states to acquire higher quality, more effective content aligned to the CCSS in a smarter, far less expensive, and far more flexible manner, and make these available to districts. Specifically, states and districts can transition from expensive and rigidly controlled materials to open educational resources (OER). These new open instructional resources are low-cost and can be accessed and used in distinct and improved ways from traditional materials. Their copyright is structured differently, allowing states and districts to freely and legally change, improve, adapt, make copies, and give away copies of the materials.

The K12 OER Collaborative was formed in order to take advantage of this unique opportunity to provide America's schools with high-quality, open, CCSS-aligned instructional materials at an enormous cost savings. New materials will be created for every grade level through a competitive RFP process per the specifications of the participating states. The materials developed as part of this project may build on existing OER or be newly created. The goal is that the resulting OER offer the full range of instructional supports, assessments and CCSS alignments that best meet the needs of educators. These materials will be openly licensed (CC BY), updated annually, aligned to assessments, and available for free in both digital and print format. A multi-state planning effort is currently underway, coordinated and funded by The Learning Accelerator, with significant expertise about OER and curriculum provided by Creative Commons, Lumen Learning, and state content specialists. The goal is to get support from 15 states and coordinate fundraising to create and update the initial content, and then extend to additional subjects in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Cable Green

Cable Green

Director of Open Education, Creative Commons
Cable is an "Open Education & Policy" guy. Cable works with the global open education community to leverage open licensing, OER, open policies, and open pedagogy to significantly improve access to quality, affordable, education and research resources so everyone in the world can attain all the education they desire.
avatar for Karl Nelson

Karl Nelson

Director, Digital Learning, WA OSPI
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd
avatar for Jennifer Wolfe

Jennifer Wolfe

Partner, The Learning Accelerator


Thursday November 20, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Virginia Ballroom

2:30pm

Making (Re-)Sharing Central: New Software Architectures for OER Dissemination & Discovery
Most OER initiatives have focussed on the production of OER, search and discovery tools for OER, or aggregation & repository sites for OER. However, in between production and search and discovery lies an under examined part of the process -- community *re*-sharing of materials.

By "re-sharing", we refer to the re-publication of materials the publisher has not created themselves, and has often only minimally edited. Over the past ten years, re-sharing has become a central feature of many social publishing platforms. Most such platforms rely on these re-sharers to make discoverability happen, and see sharing as the behavior which drives production and community engagement. Tumblr is the land of "reblogs", Twitter of re-tweets, and Facebook of resharing posts. Central to many of these systems is the idea that to "use" is necessarily to "reshare". Additionally, reuse in these systems is not seen as "consumption", but rather an activity valuable in its own right.

This session will focus on the role that newer software architectures for re-sharing can play in the publication, dissemination, and discovery of Open Educational Resources. While we will deal with the theoretical underpinnings of the new approaches, the main focus will be to demonstrate new tools we have built that make the resharing of material a natural, rewarding, and enjoyable, and to some extent automatic part of the reuse process.

Speakers
MC

Michael Caulfield

Washington State University Vancouver
TO

Tim Owens

Instructional Tech SpecialistUniversity of Mary Washington


Thursday November 20, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Crystal Ballroom

2:30pm

The State of Open in Virginia
OpenVA held its first conference in Oct 2013. This conference was the result of a working group of representatives from Virginia's public colleges and universities charged by Virginia Governor Robert McDonnell and Secretary of Education Laura Fornash to start exploring the possibilities of open education. The initial goal of this group was to bring together educators who were experimenting with the idea of 'open' at their institutions. Through various exhibits and presentations we began to see the scope of experimentation happening around the state. Open textbooks, flipped classrooms, collaborative oases, open source online learning environments, and augmented reality were just a few of the concepts being deployed.

We discovered that many innovative and creative projects were taking place in Virginia providing valuable and accessible learning opportunities for students through various media. Social learning and student knowledge building was a key theme. There were presentations of digital storytelling, student authored open textbooks, student blogging platforms, and curation through the use of social media such as Pinterest and Twitter. Not surprisingly, gamification as a motivational and collaborative tool were also a topic of interest in the context of social learning.

A common refrain, at the conclusion of our first OpenVA conference, was that the diverse range of initiatives was both inspirational and a little overwhelming. We had created a successful showcase to highlight the best open innovations in the state. We began to think that a subsequent event would need to have a sharper focus and, at its conclusion, some form of 'call to action' in terms of infrastructure and policy.

By the time OpenEd 2014 commences, Virginia will have concluded the OpenVA Summit which is scheduled for October 18, 2014. Our second annual conference will be structured quite differently from the first, featuring three of the most ambitious initiatives, including the "Z" degree at Tidewater Community College (open resources), A Domain of Ones Own at UMW (open infrastructure), and ds106 (open pedagogy). Each presentation will be followed by a panel discussion. Each panel addressing the same question: "How can we scale these model programs so that all Virginia institutions can have the guidance, support, and collaborative environment necessary to successfully deploy these initiatives across the state and beyond?"

What's more, in addition to faculty, technologists, and support staff, this conference will be inviting targeted state legislators, policy makers, and university administrators in order to start realizing how we build a cyberinfrastructure to promote and support open education in the state of Virginia.

In this panel presentation we provide some insights gleaned after two iterations of OpenVA, offering some insights on the policies and strategies necessary to move from the small and impactful innovations currently taking place to a broader, more far reaching approach to bring 'open' throughout the state.

Speakers
avatar for Beverly Covington

Beverly Covington

Policy Analyst, State Council of Higher Education for VA
I have coordinated the planning of Open VA, an event that has brought together faculty and administrators of public institutions in Virginia to share their experiences with open resource initiatives. As a policy analyst for Virginia's coordinating board for public higher education, I advocate for implementation of policies that will support and encourage such innovative projects and practices.
DR

Diane Ryan

Dean, Tidewater Community College
avatar for Richard Sebastian

Richard Sebastian

Director, OER Degree Initiative, Achieving the Dream
Dr. Richard Sebastian is the Director of Achieving the Dream's OER Degree Initiative, an effort to support colleges across the United States in designing degree programs using open educational resources. | | Before joining ATD, Richard was the Director of Teaching and Learning Technologies for the Virginia Community College System, providing vision, leadership, and support for effective use of teaching and learning technologies for the 23... Read More →


Thursday November 20, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Richmond

2:30pm

Using Multiple Means of Open to Solve Global Food Safety Challenges
In this presentation, Paul Stacey and Garin Fons discuss the work of a recent collaboration with Theresa Bernardo (Michigan State University) to draft an open models concept paper for the World Bank's Global Food Safety Partnership (GFSP) – a public-private initiative focused on improving the safety of food and food systems in middle-income and developing countries.

In December 2013, the GFSP Knowledge and Learning Working Group (KLWG) formed an open models sub-working group to generate a range of open models that would enhance the scalability and sustainability of food safety. As a part of this working group, the primary goal of our team was to show how open models could support the GFSP's efforts to help ensure safe food, increase food supply chain value, accelerate economic growth, alleviate rural poverty, and improve public health outcomes. We identified open value propositions for GFSP stakeholders and proposed a framework for creating and structuring that value.

We argue that open models have the potential to significantly improve global food safety systems and that open models increase opportunities to form a new paradigm for multi-stakeholder collaboration and capacity building. We will discuss how we see the many forms of openness, including such things as Open Educational Resources (OER), Open Access (OA), open data, and open policy being adopted across all stakeholders and at different stages of knowledge production and dissemination.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Stacey

Paul Stacey

Associate Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons
I live just outside Vancouver Canada and work on Creative Common's global open education and open business models initiatives. I like ping pong, cycling, art, food, and drink - count me in on parties.


Thursday November 20, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Roanoke

3:00pm

From OER newbies to leaders in the community: the Kaleidoscope Fellows' Experience
The Kaleidoscope Project is an open education project funded by a Next Generation Learning Challenges grant (provided by the Bill and Melinda Gates and the Hewlett Foundations). The project implemented general education courses across several institutions of higher learning, including two and four-year colleges and private colleges across the United States that serve large populations of at-risk students with the intention of improving student success (as evidenced by earning a C or better in their course) and decreasing academic withdrawals.

Many of those who became involved in the project started off as newbies to the OER movement and have become leaders in the open community, as well as at their respective institutions. This panel of Kaleidoscope Fellows will discuss their experiences from the beginning to their evolution (from the good, the bad, and the ugly) as strong OER advocates.

The Fellows will address the following questions:
1. How did using OER impact their students' success and retention?
2. What impact or influence has their work had at their institution and amongst other faculty members?
3. How are they spreading the message outside of their institutions?
4. Why give back?

Speakers
LC

Linda Casper

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, NY
avatar for Amber Gilewski

Amber Gilewski

Associate Professor of Psychology, Tompkins Cortland Community College
Veganism, environmentalism, animal rights, human rights, feminism, social justice, the democratization of education, open content, and comic relief.
ZK

Zsuzsa Kozmane-Fejes

Visiting Instructor, Mercy College


Thursday November 20, 2014 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Virginia Ballroom

3:00pm

How to manage the adaptation of open textbooks
Adapt, Remix, or Modify. Join members of the BCcampus Open Textbook team to learn how to manage the adaptation of open textbooks.

Speakers
avatar for Lauri Aesoph

Lauri Aesoph

Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
I support the development and sharing of open educational resources in British Columbia. I have project managed and led workshops and webinars on the adoption, adaptation, and creation of open educational resources. I also provide technical and instructional design support for the B.C. Open Textbook Project as a Manager of Open Education, as well, blog about and create support guides and other materials for faculty and staff working in this area... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Coolidge

Amanda Coolidge

Senior Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
BCcampus


Thursday November 20, 2014 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Crystal Ballroom

3:00pm

Lessons learned & important foundations in European OER-policy
With the initiation of a national open e-textbooks program in 2011, Poland gained the potential to be one of the leading countries with regard to open education at K-12 levels. After 3 years, with the launch of initial batch of e-textbook content in 2013, and start of another open textbooks program (a free, printed 1st grade textbook, to be distributed to all students but also made available under CC BY), Polish K-12 education system is poised towards a strong public OER production model.

In The Netherlands a national OER-platform was born in 2008. The platform called Wikiwijs was launched with strong support from the government. What can we say after more than six years of opportunity for teachers to share? What should we take-away from the Wikiwijs-model and what should we do differently in the future?  

This session will provide an overview of policy developments in the last several years in Europe, focussing on The Netherlands and Poland. A key focus will be given to an interplay of grassroots activities, initiated in 2008 by the Coalition for Open Education, and top-down policy developments. Ultimately, OER success is due to an open, public debate on the shape of educational resources for schools.

Speakers
avatar for Lisette Kalshoven

Lisette Kalshoven

Advisor copyright, heritage and open education, Kennisland
Lisette Kalshoven is advisor at Kennisland in the areas of copyright, heritage and open education. She combines writing policy documents with practical interventions and training sessions for professionals. Creating access to information is always the reference point in her work. | | @LNKalshoven
avatar for Alek Tarkowski

Alek Tarkowski

Director, Centrum Cyfrowe / Communia
Director of the Centre, Alek manages projects for a reform of laws and public policies (policy). Co-founder and coordinator of the Creative Commons Poland, he also acts as the European Policy Fellow for the American organization Creative Commons, which leads the project "OER Policies for Europe". Co-founder and now also vice-chairman of the Coalition for Open Education. Actively involved in Communia, the European... Read More →


Thursday November 20, 2014 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Richmond

3:00pm

Using the Collection and Technology of the Digital Public Library of America for Open Education
The Digital Public Library of America holds millions of openly available items from over a thousand libraries, archives, and museums in the United States. It also runs a technology platform and API that can serve that rich content not only on its site but across other sites and apps. DPLA Executive Director Dan Cohen will discuss the ways that DPLA is currently used in open education, ranging from traditional classroom use to experimental software. He will also explore methods for discovery, exploration, and serendipity in DPLA, and how others can get started using this expansive resource.

Speakers
DC

Dan Cohen

Executive Director, Digital Public Library of America
Dan Cohen is the Founding Executive Director of the DPLA, where he works to further the DPLA’s mission to make the cultural and scientific heritage of humanity available, free of charge, to all. Prior to his tenure, Dan was the Director of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. At the Center, Dan oversaw projects ranging from new publishing ventures (PressForward) to online collections (September 11... Read More →


Thursday November 20, 2014 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Roanoke
 
Friday, November 21
 

8:00am

Registration
Friday November 21, 2014 8:00am - 8:30am
Virginia Ballroom Foyer

8:30am

Keynote - John Wilbanks
Speakers

Friday November 21, 2014 8:30am - 9:30am
Virginia Ballroom

9:45am

An API of One's Own: Individual Identities as First-Class Citizens in the Open Badges Infrastructure
Digital badges and their paper and sheepskin-based credential ancestors are ways of sharing socially important information that is tied to identity. Open Badges go further in helping people establish their identity by letting them collect together credentials from many issuers. Each Open Badge describes a trust relationship between its issuer and its recipient, in terms of criteria, evidence, and an image. The powerful part is that this relationship is verifiable and sharable with outside audiences. Any person or organization can participate in the ecosystem as any one of these roles. Because of this feature, Open Badges are a great step toward democratizing the credentialing ecosystem.

However, the Open Badge Infrastructure (OBI) standard constructs these three roles separately, defining identities differently for each. As the credentialing world begins to include more badge-aware applications that can talk to one another, we can build some awesome apps that issue, earn, and consume badges. There are exciting possibilities in learning pathway discovery, e-portfolios, personal learning networks as well as applications that use badges to describe relationships outside of education.

In this moment, there is a chance to elevate both individuals and organizations to simultaneously serve all three roles in the ecosystem, as badge issuers, earners, and consumers without undermining the carefully built reputations of respected issuing institutions that currently occupy that role. How can we extend the OBI standard and construct our badge applications to give people personal access to the APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) that give them easy access to all three badge ecosystem roles and let them construct their identity as full players in this network? We'll take a look at what might be the killer apps that would justify this effort.

Nate Otto, badges researcher, developer, and founding member of the Badge Alliance standards working group, will showcase possibilities and prototypes for applications that democratize badges. Serge Ravet will contribute theory and practice of building networks of trust relationships with badges and evidence and consequences for the badges ecosystem. The Open Education Conference is the perfect place to celebrate how free and open technology can empower individuals to help shape the networks around them.

NOTE: I requested 50 minutes, but if you really have to squeeze things in, I'd be fine with sharing a block with another badges presentation. I don't think this will be quite as firebrand in tone as Gardner Campbell's "No Digital Facelifts", but I aim to follow in his and Jim Groom's footsteps on letting learners have a Personal Badge Infrastructure like Personal Web Infrastructure. My co-presenter Serge may not be able to make the trip to DC from France; we'll see in a few months. You're still my favorite conference, OpenEd!

Speakers
NO

Nate Otto

Indiana University
avatar for Serge Ravet

Serge Ravet

Innovation Director @ ADPIOS, Europortfolio / Badge Europe!
I'm currently leading Badge Europe! and Europortfolio, two European initiatives which objective is to promote technologies empowering individuals as reflective learners and practitioners. | | I advocate a holistic view of learning and knowledge technologies, integrating individual, community and organisational learning. I published The Internet of Subjects Manifesto to explore the opportunities for creating a world where individuals are... Read More →


Friday November 21, 2014 9:45am - 10:15am
Richmond

9:45am

Impact of International Organizations on Governmental OER Policies

This presentation provides an overview of the PhD research entitled: Impact of International Organizations on Governmental OER Policies.


Speakers
avatar for Igor Lesko

Igor Lesko

Operations Manager & Open Education Specialist, Open Education Consortium
Open Education, Open Policy


Friday November 21, 2014 9:45am - 10:15am
Blue Ridge Room

9:45am

Making the Sausage: The Greasy Process of Scaling OER in Virginia
A successful OER project is one in which free and openly licensed course materials are not just created but reused. Through a combination of grant initiatives, colleges projects, and individual faculty efforts, the 23 colleges of the VCCS have created over 30 high enrollment courses that carry no textbook costs. However, the real challenge now is building a culture in which these course materials are shared, reused, and maintained.

This presentation will be both a practical guide and cautionary tale for anyone interested in hearing of the trials and tribulations of a large community college system quickly scaling an open culture among heterogeneous institutions in a large, diverse state. The story of OER in Virginia is a good one, but is just beginning.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Sebastian

Richard Sebastian

Director, OER Degree Initiative, Achieving the Dream
Dr. Richard Sebastian is the Director of Achieving the Dream's OER Degree Initiative, an effort to support colleges across the United States in designing degree programs using open educational resources. | | Before joining ATD, Richard was the Director of Teaching and Learning Technologies for the Virginia Community College System, providing vision, leadership, and support for effective use of teaching and learning technologies for the 23... Read More →


Friday November 21, 2014 9:45am - 10:15am
Crystal Ballroom

9:45am

Dinner for seven: Reflections on VCU's first cMOOC
During the Summer of 2014, Virginia Commonwealth University ventured into the MOOC space with a cMOOC called, at least, Living the Dreams. Actually, that's the short title. If this were a book (which it is, kind of), and it had a full title (which it does, broadly considered), it would go like this::UNIV 200: Inquiry and the Craft of Argument. Digital Engagement Pilot. Alternate title: "Living the Dreams: Digital Investigation and Unfettered Minds." Organizing principle: Thought Vectors In Concept Space. TLT (top-level tag): thoughtvectors (on Twitter: #thoughtvectors – see also @thoughtvectors – and, of course, thoughtvectors.net). This learning experience launched students in search of great questions and artful arguments, challenging learners to assemble their own Engelbartian dynamic knowledge repositories as they strive for "unfettered minds."

From 2001-2005, the Independent Film Channel ran a show called Dinner for Five wherein film director Jon Favreau and "a revolving guest list of celebrities eat, drink and talk about life on and off the set and swap stories about projects past and present." Riffing on that, for this OpenEd session, the team of core instructors and technologists from VCU's first MOOC will reconvene to offer thought vectors in conference space. Sitting around a table eating and drinking during the conference session, this will be a formal time of reflection on a wild and crazy learning experience, both for the facilitators and the learners. Dinner for Five was often "...an unpredictable free-for-all," and who knows what will happen during this unique OpenEd. session.

Part happening, part improvisatory theatre with the entire "audience" sharing the room (and perhaps a virtual one too), and part demonstration of learning innovation in general education, this session will be mind-bending and thought-provoking, testing and stretching the limits of what authentic, thoughtful, transformative research writing can be in the digital age

Speakers
avatar for Jon Becker

Jon Becker

Director of Learning Innovation and Online Academi, Virginia Commonwealth University
BB

Bonnie Boaz

Assistant Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University
avatar for Tom Woodward

Tom Woodward

Assistant Director of Learning Innovation and Onli, Virginia Commonwealth University


Friday November 21, 2014 9:45am - 10:15am
Roanoke

9:45am

Lumen Learning: Community, Sustainability, Student Success
Lumen Learning is striving to diversify the open ecosystem, providing a supportive, sustaining offering that enhances the community. This session will present progress, learning and solutions. The session will also seek feedback on needs and approaches from participants.

Speakers
avatar for Kim Thanos

Kim Thanos

CEO, Lumen Learning
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Friday November 21, 2014 9:45am - 10:15am
Virginia Ballroom

10:15am

Open Digital Badges: Achievement Based Learning in K12
Mountain Heights Academy shares its experience with badging and mastery based learning in secondary courses. Leveraging the Mozilla Open Badge platform, Mountain Heights has rebuilt and piloted 5 courses built to identify and validate specific skills needed for student mastery. Mountain Heights explores their process for badge system design and the impact and implications of open digital badges in secondary schools.

Speakers
EA

Emily Andersen

Assistant Director, Mountain Heights Academy
Emily Andersen has worked secondary education for 10 ten years as an English and History teacher, administrator, curriculum developer and in a multitude of settings--public, private and charter. Emily was awarded a ISKME fellowship in 2012 and an Association of American Educators grant to forward her students’ online Literary Magazine, The Virtual Inkblot. She has built over 5 online semester courses using OER and is currently the Assistant... Read More →
avatar for DeLaina Tonks

DeLaina Tonks

Director, Mountain Heights Academy
I am the Director of Mountain Heights Academy (formerly the Open High School of Utah), an online public charter school committed to building and sharing OER curricula.
avatar for Sarah Morse Weston

Sarah Morse Weston

Director of Technology and OER, Mountain Heights Academy
Sarah Weston has worked in secondary education for 18 years, as a teacher, administrator, and curriculum designer. She has built 17 semester courses using Open Educational Resources (OER) and currently oversees all course development and teacher training on building with OER. Sarah was awarded Utah Charter Educator of the Year in 2010; the first online educator to receive the award. Sarah is a regular presenter at national conferences... Read More →


Friday November 21, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am
Richmond

10:15am

OER, Open Access and Scholarship in Portuguese Public Higher Education
Speakers
PC

Paula Cardoso

PhD researcher on OER and Open Access | Member of GO-GN research network | @eLearning_paula


Friday November 21, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am
Blue Ridge Room

10:15am

Evolving Towards Open At A Relatively Closed Institution
The JIBC is a Canadian public post-secondary institution with a strong social justice mandate that aligns quite nicely with the open education resource movement, yet it struggles to find its place within the conservative business models of the institution. Nonetheless, the open projects that have been implemented or are underway range from open courses and open textbooks to open simulations and entire program curriculum. This presentation describes some of these projects, and provides a descriptive analysis of the numerous drivers that have lead to the evolution of the institution to one that is more actively engaging with open. These drivers include better technologies, government policy, cost savings, strong sector-wide communication and leadership, funding expectations, and a greater understanding of the benefits for the institution and for students, among others. Interestingly and importantly, the remix and reuse advantages have provided greater buy-in than creating new OER. It is apparent that the combination of these drivers as a "critical mass' has been the key in evolving the institution towards embracing, rather than fearing open, in a short period of time.

Speakers
avatar for Tannis Morgan

Tannis Morgan

Associate Dean, Centre for Teaching, Learning & In, JIBC


Friday November 21, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am
Crystal Ballroom

10:15am

Building on new architectures for OER to connect distributed communities of learning
Challenging the restrictions of space and time---of a thing called a "course"---requires an open architecture that is friendly to faculty and students, but often outside of the technology infrastructure provided by university support services. We can't---we would not want to---use a closed LMS to share and co-create knowledge with other learning communities, but going outside the LMS is often a scary proposition for faculty.

The tools and web architectures needed for meaningfully connecting distributed communities of learners are more accessible than ever. Now is the time for instructional designers and technologists to be exploring with faculty the affordances of these open architectures to break free from closed spaces that restrict who can interact with whom, how, and when. 

This session will highlight a pilot project at Stanford to build and leverage new digital architectures that support interaction and sharing among distributed learning communities. We will discuss how Professor David Palumbo-Liu, and a team of instructional designers and technologists, pieced together open web services and tools (drupal and a federated wiki) to connect students in David's Human Rights course with other communities focused on human rights. We will also demo an open tool built by Stanford's Division of Literature, Cultures, and Language, as part of a project called Lacuna Stories, that allows learners to collaboratively annotate and stitch together texts and media to create new conversations about historical events.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Collier

Amy Collier

Director of Digital Learning Initiatives, Stanford University
avatar for Andy Saltarelli

Andy Saltarelli

Director of Digital Learning Initiatives, Stanford University
Andy Saltarelli, PhD is an instructional designer for the Office of the Vice Provost for Online Learning (vpol.stanford.edu). He provides expertise in online course development and design to faculty from all disciplines. Andy has extensive experience in learner-based course design and the integration of digital and open technologies. His disciplinary background is in educational and social psychology and research centers how social contextual... Read More →
avatar for Michael Widner

Michael Widner

Academic Technology Specialist, Stanford University Libraries


Friday November 21, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am
Roanoke

10:15am

'A Year in the Trenches' - Lessons Learned from the Z-Degree
: In 2013 Tidewater Community College assembled a team of 13 faculty members who came together to create the first A.S. Degree in the nation based solely on OER. The student response to the Z Degree has been overwhelming, but this session looks at this project from the faculty perspective. Members of the team will share their experiences creating, delivering and improving the 21 distinct courses that make up the Z Degree.

Speakers
DP

Debbie Porter

Associate Professor, Tidewater Community College
DR

Diane Ryan

Dean, Tidewater Community College
avatar for Linda  S. Williams

Linda S. Williams

Professor, Tidewater Community College
Business Professor Linda Williams has become the face of TCC’s Textbook Free Degree. She’s been featured in countless articles and television interviews about the cutting edge program that enables TCC business students to earn an entire degree while spending zero funds for textbooks. | | “It is amazing to be the first accredited institution of higher learning to offer a fully OER-based degree,” said Williams. “While we see the... Read More →


Friday November 21, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am
Virginia Ballroom

11:00am

Open Teacher Training--Changing the Focus of Teacher Prep
The Teaching Open Online Learning (TOOL) program launched in early 2014 as an orientation tool for Georgia Virtual Learning (GaVL) teachers. However, the resource is open to all teachers, school districts, and institutions of higher learning. In the badge driven environment, participants engage in five major areas of online learning: Participate, Navigate, Communicate, Create, and Evaluate.

Along with GaVL, TOOL is being used in teacher prep programs within Georgia along with school districts using the program to train teachers in blended and online learning concepts. Many participants are opting to complete the program just for personal enrichment.

The badging concept provides two opportunities to users. A registered model allows participants to self award badges upon the completion of certain tasks. The badges can be award for each area individually, or for the TOOL program as a whole. A verified option is also available where the participants work is reviewed by a trained, experience, online teacher to assure that the badge components are completed to a satisfactory degree.

While still in its infancy, GaVL's TOOL enrollment grows on a monthly basis. In April and May, the verified program had to be capped at 50 participants and additional verified opportunities had to be provided.

Come by the session and see the latest data on how TOOL is effecting the online teacher training model and how it may be beneficial to your organization.

website: https://www.openteachertraining.org/

Speakers
TE

Tami Echard

Supervisor of Instructional Development, Georgia Virtual School
We will be starting our fourth year of OER Course development for 6-12 courses. We are starting an Elementary School Spanish Pilot program and will add some OER Resources for this level as well.
avatar for Jay Heap

Jay Heap

Georgia Virtual Learning


Friday November 21, 2014 11:00am - 11:30am
Richmond

11:00am

Understanding the interplay between open culture, institutional structure and academic agency in lecturers' contribution and non-contribution of Open Educational Resources: A social realist approach
Speakers
G

Glenda

Lecturer, University of Cape Town
Why academics choose to share or not share their teaching materials as OER. The quality in OER debate. OER and the Library. OER and Open access.


Friday November 21, 2014 11:00am - 11:30am
Blue Ridge Room

11:00am

NOVA's OER-Based Certificate and Associate Degree Project.
The need to increase access to and reduce the costs of attending college is a burden shared by all higher education institutions. One way that Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) has addressed this growing concern is through an innovative two-phase project to promote the use of Open Educational Resources (OER) across the curriculum.

NOVA's OER-Based Certificate and Associate Degree Project is designed to provide any student at NOVA the opportunity to take anywhere from one course to an entire degree, utilizing free and/or open course materials, to deliver a high quality learning experience without requiring the purchase of textbooks. Many of these OER courses are also offered to students enrolled at more than a dozen other Virginia Community Colleges.

The OER-Based Certificate and Associate Degree Project at NOVA was designed to affect the broadest possible population of students by creating course options in a variety of subjects that will save students money and ensure that all students in these courses have equal access to all course materials. Students can take selected courses, complete a General Education Certificate, or complete two Associate Degree tracks that do not require the purchase of textbooks.

Our team of Faculty, Distance Learning Librarians, and Instructional Designers are able to develop, deliver, and maintain effective and engaging courses using quality free and open materials thanks in part to an active and growing global OER community.

Speakers
avatar for Preston Davis

Preston Davis

Director, Instructional Service, NOVA
I have worked in higher education for 20 years… as faculty, administrator, and consultant. As Director of Instructional Services at NOVA, I oversee the online learning and educational technology services, manage instructional training and certification, and lead the OER initiative. I also find time to teach a philosophy course on occasion. | I earned BS and MA degrees from Old Dominion University, and a doctorate from The George... Read More →


Friday November 21, 2014 11:00am - 11:30am
Crystal Ballroom

11:00am

Universities Without Borders
The presenter will share research from his forthcoming OER book, to argue the learning benefits and societal gains from moving beyond classrooms without walls (MOOC), to universities without borders in a new paradigm for formal and informal learning enabled by OER. The Web 2.0 has brought unprecedented change to learning communities and passionate affinity groups through the global democratization of information using social media. OER makes learning content accessible to anyone, anywhere with access to the Web, increasingly via mobile computing devices, for bespoke learning mashups.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Boileau

Tim Boileau

Indiana State University
I blog at: http://twitter.com/timboileau and http://timboileau.wordpress.com/


Friday November 21, 2014 11:00am - 11:30am
Roanoke

11:00am

Tools for the Bleeding Edge of Open Learning
Experts.
Peer 2 Peer University creates collaborative, community-driven, authentic learning experiences on the web (vs. tutorials, multiple choice, or "right answers"). Over the course of 5 years, we've experimented widely with badges, voting interfaces, forums, cohorts, video meetups, feedback mechanisms and virtual sprints. We've spread our approach to peer learning design with Mozilla, GovLab, Creative Commons, the MIT Media Lab and NYU.

Toolmakers.
Along the way, we've developed tools to enable social learning *around* open content, and we've put together some best practices on what works in this new era of open. This session will walk through our suite of support in helping other folks get started building communities on the web. We'll walk through our open learning toolkit, called "School in a Box," which will cover:
How to bootstrap learning communities on the web
Nurturing creative serendipity in small groups
How to use GitHub pages + Jekyll + Discourse to offer an open course
Peer learning principles and co-design practices
Defining success and iterating on your course design
We'll show you a bit of what these principles look like in action.

Support / Collaborator Community
P2PU is a community of edutinkerers, and the close of the session will discuss how to receive peer support for your open learning project, and how the P2PU community can help bring your social learning idea to fruition.

Speakers
avatar for Vanessa Gennarelli

Vanessa Gennarelli

Learning Lead, Peer 2 Peer University
I build learning communities on the web with Peer 2 Peer University. | | Our recent projects include: | Writing for Change: students develop a proposal to enact social change in their community. We've partnered with College Unbound, an experiential, accredited university in Rhode Island for adult learners. | Webmaker Training: a "train the trainers" course for Mozilla's Teach the Web initiative. | Play With Your Music: a playful... Read More →


Friday November 21, 2014 11:00am - 11:30am
Virginia Ballroom

11:30am

Delivering OCW/OER on a Competency-Based Learning Platform
The Saylor Academy & Learning Objects have partnered to reinvent the way Open Courseware is delivered and self-managed by learners. Instead of a flat portal with links to OCW/OER collections, the Saylor Academy platform is now competency-based.

When learners engage with the platform, they first select from a catalog of learning goals, each of which has an associated set of competencies associated with it. Through assessments, badges from other sources, or self-declaration, learners establish their current competencies relative to their goals. This process also identifies each individual learner's competency gaps. The platform then recommends a set of OCW/OER learning activities targeted to help learners close their gaps.

After completing their learning activities, they have an opportunity to demonstrate achievement of their "gap" competencies (via assessment, artifact submission, etc.). Once these competencies are validated, the learner is granted an associated stackable badge. These badges then appear on the learner's competency transcript.

This platform enables learners purposively self-manage their interactions with the OCW/OER content and activities available through the Saylor Academy. It also provides an aggregation point for learners to assemble and document their learning activities from a variety of sources.

The platform also supports instructors or institutions guiding groups or cohorts of learners engaging in Saylor's OCW/OER offerings. This support includes a variety of reports and dashboards to monitor learner activity, performance, and to provide targeted, timely intervention to support at-risk leaners.

This session will provide an overview, demonstration, and review of early learner feedback on the platform.

Speakers
avatar for Jon Mott, Ph.D.

Jon Mott, Ph.D.

Chief Learning Officer, Learning Objects
Passionate about transforming teaching and learning through personalization and adaptivity. No two learners are alike. Through powerful personalized, competency-based learning tools we can empower unique learners to achieve their goals at their pace.


Friday November 21, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm
Richmond

11:30am

Open textbook development and analytics
Speakers

Friday November 21, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm
Blue Ridge Room

11:30am

OER Remix Ology: A (gently) shaken, not stirred, curriculum and course design model
It's easy to fall in love with the promise of open education. However, it's difficult to put the promise into an effective and scalable practice on a college or university campus. This session will discuss one model for facilitating OER course development on a college campus.

Motivated by a challenge to make higher education more affordable, Chadron State College (CSC) has remixed recipes drawn from others in the OER community, tossed additional ingredients into the mix, and developed approaches to curriculum and course design that encourage, as well as endorse, the use of open-education resources (OER). A librarian, an instructional designer, a faculty member, and a technical specialist will discuss CSC's history with OER and the evolution of a design process that reduces (and works toward eliminating) course textbook costs. Expect a convivial yet candid mix of remixers who will share with attendees some of their successes tempered by a few of their concerns.

The group invites spontaneity and may include attendee participation throughout much of the session. Potential topics of discussion may include faculty incentives, copyright issues, academic rigor, backward design, authorship and attribution, interoperability, undergraduate research, sustainable practice, ADA compliance, costs savings, permissions and licensing, course evaluation and revision.

Speakers
CF

Christine Fullerton

Librarian, Chadron State College
avatar for Elizabeth Ledbetter

Elizabeth Ledbetter

Teaching and Learning Center, Chadron State College
I work to facilitate teaching for learning in my role as Instructional Technology and Design Specialist at Chadron State College in Chadron, Nebraska. I coordinate course development for online programs that seek to eliminate course material costs through the use of OER and no-cost materials.
JS

Jesse Sealey

Assistant Professor of Education, Chadron State College
I am currently in my fourth year as an assistant professor of education at Chadron State College in Chadron, Nebraska. I teach undergraduate methods courses in math, science, and reading as well as assessment and curriculum courses. I also teach graduate courses in our curriculum and instruction and education administration. My background includes four years of teaching third and fourth grade language arts and math and preschool and five years as... Read More →
avatar for Bryant Serres

Bryant Serres

Specialist, Information Technology, Chadron State College


Friday November 21, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm
Crystal Ballroom

11:30am

Case Studies on the Student as Producer
Case Studies on the Student as Producer

The student as producer pedagogical model emphasizes the role of the student as collaborators in the production of knowledge. In this model, the university's approaches to learning and research are closer aligned; for example, students, similar to researchers, are asked to share their work beyond the walls of the classroom and not just with their immediate instructor or advisor. This session will examine how educators, through the embrace of open pedagogies, can support learners in their role as active participants in both their learning and their institution's intellectual output. It will explore case studies from multiple open courses, assignments, and projects at the University of British Columbia and other institutions that asked learners to not only be students but also creators, authors, researchers, performers, instructors, scholars, designers, and problem solvers. The session will provide an in-depth discussion on the how choices around accessible curriculum, remixable content, and extendible technologies can impact student abilities to fully participate and engage as equals in their learning. It will also explore best practices for how institutions can establish sustainable frameworks that support emerging pedagogical practices, open education initiatives, and modern web trends, such as open badges, leading to authentic learning experiences that empower students.

This session will incorporate audience participation through discussion and brainstorming. The presenters will be responsive to questions and audience feedback will determine the scope of topics covered. Participants will be encouraged to discuss and reflect on how topics and strategies can be applied to their home institutions.


Speakers
avatar for Will Engle

Will Engle

Strategist, Open Education Initiatives, The University of British Columbia
Teaching and Learning Centre Staff
avatar for Novak Rogic

Novak Rogic

Web Strategy Manager, CTLT - UBC
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rogic


Friday November 21, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm
Roanoke

11:30am

Web-based open learning tools for the blind
The movement to open up courseware has largely omitted the needs of those of us who are blind. My development work for more than 20 years has focused on learning materials for foreign language learning, including textbooks and drill and practice software.

In collaboration with a technical university in Austria, I developed an HTML5-based drill and practice program with the ability to toggle between a visual interface and an audio interface. The environment has a two level menu and in the visual mode, the user is provided with a text and audio prompt , and the option for graphics. The same content is used for the audio interface with the audio as the active components. Other than a passive learning environment where the learner hears the prompt and response, there is the option to also type the answer.

The development is currently being tested with blind users in Wisconsin and South Africa. The same environment is also used by sighted learners, who can opt to use the visual interface or toggle to the audio interface.

In initial trials, I have noticed that the interactive audio interface has specific benefits for sighted learners as well. Student are compelled to focus more on the activity and their concentration is greatly increased. This offers an exciting research opportunity with this novel design.

The environment is free and open to learners and options are being explored to engage more content developers.

Speakers
avatar for Jacques du Plessis

Jacques du Plessis

President, National Council of Less Commonly Taught Languages
* Develop open courseware since 2004 for less commonly taught languages | (www.afrikaans.us). | * Currently developing open HTML5 learning tools for the blind. | (http://www.flexitutor.com/eargear/html/) | * Interested in learning about success in getting universities to adopt open | textbooks.


Friday November 21, 2014 11:30am - 12:00pm
Virginia Ballroom

1:15pm

Adaptive, Competency-based, OER Programs
Washington community colleges are about to launch a fully OER, adaptive, competency-based degree program. The program will support learners to accelerate or remediate based on their prior learning. The session will share the mechanics of the program: approaches, successes, challenges and next steps.

Speakers
CB

Connie Broughton

Director, eLearning and Open Education, Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges
Administrator
avatar for Kim Thanos

Kim Thanos

CEO, Lumen Learning


Friday November 21, 2014 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Richmond

1:15pm

Peer review of OER in contested areas explored by activity theory

Peer review of OER is analysed by activity theory. It highlights power relations and tensions within the system as well as at the boundaries to other activity systems.


Speakers
avatar for Anne ALgers

Anne ALgers

Gothenburg University


Friday November 21, 2014 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Blue Ridge Room

1:15pm

California's Open Textbook Legislation Promotes Adoption of OER To Reduce Costs and Expand Access
The California State Senate passed the Open Textbook Initiative in 2012 to reduce costs for students through promoting faculty adoption of high-quality, peer reviewed open textbooks in the highest impact college level courses. This legislation has the potential to make college more accessible to the approximately three million students who currently attend one of the three public post-secondary systems namely the 8 campuses of the University of California, the 23 campuses of the California State University, and the 112 California Community Colleges.

Join us for this session to hear about faculty collaboration between the three academic senates to identify the peer review process and the establishment of an OER repository to provide ready access to high-quality open textbooks and case studies to support faculty adoption of OER. Student feedback and support for OER adoption will be solicited at key milestones to ensure that the project is meeting the needs of both students and faculty.

The legislation first established a faculty OER council appointed by the academic senates of the three public higher education systems. The council is tasked with determining the 50 highest impact courses for students and a process for reviewing open textbooks and open educational resources that are aligned with learning outcomes and transfer agreements between colleges and universities.

Secondarily, the legislation established the creation of an OER repository to house the peer-reviewed and recommended open textbooks and make them highly available to faculty and students. The OER repository will be managed by the California State University system and will build upon the existing MERLOT (Multimedia Educational Resources for Learning and Online Teaching) database.

The legislation further required matching funds from an external donor to release California state funds to begin the project. The California State University, administrator of the Open Textbook initiative, graciously acknowledges the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation for their initial funding to launch the project.

Speakers
avatar for Una Daly

Una Daly

Community College Director, Open Education Consortium
I manage two open education projects: the Community College Consortium for OER at the Open Education Consortium and also the California Open Online Library Services at the California State University system. | | I like to talk about all aspects of open education: resources, research, and outcomes assessment, faculty adoptions, etc.
avatar for Leslie Kennedy

Leslie Kennedy

Director, Affordable Learning Solutions, California State University System Office
CSU’s Affordable Learning Solutions enables faculty to choose and provide more affordable, quality educational content for their students. By reducing CSU student course material expenses, more students acquire the course materials they need to succeed and benefit from their CSU learning experience. Now, CSU faculty and students have greater access to quality free and low-cost learning materials through a variety of ALS programs and... Read More →


Friday November 21, 2014 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Crystal Ballroom

1:15pm

If Freire Made a MOOC: Open Education as Resistance
Ceding authority is an active endeavor. Paulo Freire writes in Pedagogy of the Oppressed, "A revolutionary leadership must accordingly practice co-intentional education." The pedagogical value in openness is that it can create dialogue by increasing access and bringing together at once disparate learning spaces.

Dichotomies of leaders and learners, teachers and students, are only helpful when they facilitate rather than frustrate dialogue, and when we acknowledge these roles are permeable, transparent, and flexible. Pedagogy starts with learning as its center, not students or teachers. It's a conversation we have from whatever place we occupy in the collaboration (and that place is always shifting). Teachers must be learners, students empowered to be teachers, and our classrooms must become sites of intrinsic motivation, networked learning, and critical practice. A critical digital pedagogy demands that open educational resources must not be merely repositories of content. They must also be platforms for engaging students and teachers as full agents of their own learning. A MOOC, for example, cannot be merely a delivery mechanism, but must be aimed first and foremost at building empowered communities.

In this presentation, we'll examine how our work with MOOCs reveals that open education can quickly become a form of resistance within and outside the walls of the institution. MOOC MOOC: Dark Underbelly was a rambunctious series of discussions about the past, present, and future of education. The event was a spinoff of MOOC MOOC, a meta-MOOC about MOOCs, which we ran three times in 2012 and 2013. The goal of our work has not been to make better MOOCs, but to examine MOOCs and our experiences in them to put open education more deeply in conversation with critical pedagogy.

Education is "the practice of freedom", Freire writes, "as opposed to education as the practice of domination, [which] denies that man is abstract, isolated, independent, and unattached to the world; it also denies that the world exists as a reality apart from people. Authentic reflection considers neither abstract man nor the world without people, but people in their relations with the world." Open Education as a practice, then, must necessarily also be rebellion. Openness is not simply an approach, but an incendiary device that brings into conversation matters of learning, pedagogy, and power that classrooms with closed doors omit. But open education is no panacea. Hierarchies must be dismantled -- and that dismantling honored as an ethic -- if the potentials of open education are to be realized.

Speakers
avatar for Sean Michael Morris

Sean Michael Morris

Director, Hybrid Pedagogy
Writer, Director at Hybrid Pedagogy, contemplative, digital agnostic
avatar for Jesse Stommel

Jesse Stommel

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Director, Hybrid Pedagogy
Pedagogy / Open Education / Public Digital Humanities / Shakespeare / Horror Film / Fan of One Word Sentences


Friday November 21, 2014 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Roanoke

1:15pm

Toward a Paleoconnectivism Reader
In pursuing progress, striving to inhabit the "Bleeding Edge of Open" (as one theme of this conference proposes), it can be easy to disregard and lose the insights of recent and more distant experience. In an attempt to luxuriate in this problem, the presenters are developing a Paleoconnectivism Reader, intended to frame the current moment in open education and technology in a broader historical context. Paleoconnectivism is a conceptual position that the co-presenters, and others working in the open education space, have been developing over a number of years via blogs and discussion. It is only recently that we have discussed collecting and analysing these ideas as a way of shaping the implications of this position.

Many of the recent developments in "Open Education" have been ahistorical, taking a position either against or in ignorance of the existing literature and theory. Whereas any field could and should welcome challenge and debate from new ideas, the use of contested histories and refusal to acknowledge prior work has caused a rift between existing and emerging practice.

The Reader will collect essays, memoirs, and creative expressions in a book, and in an online companion. Proposed themes include "History Is A Commercial" and "The Stories We Have Told Ourselves Offer An Insight Into The Values We Hold", as well as a series of vignettes drawn from instructional guides for the web published during the 1990?s. Attendees will be invited to offer feedback, suggestions for stories and themes, and sources for investigation. It is hoped the session will provoke contributions for both the print and multimedia version of the Reader from participants.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Lamb

Brian Lamb

Director Innovation, Thompson Rivers University
I'm most interested in: | | * a vision of open education in which open practices and open technologies are at least as important as OER. | | * a vision of higher educational institutions that embraces their mandate as stewards of knowledge and inquiry. To me that means more permeable boundaries, more engagement with the wider world, and a renewed commitment to public service in learning. | | * playing the drums at the jam... Read More →


Friday November 21, 2014 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Virginia Ballroom

1:45pm

Moving from Open Courseware to Student-Created Degree Pathways
Thanks to the efforts of open content producers, students from all over the globe have access to educational resources to an unprecedented degree. However, aside from a few notable cases (Lumen Learning-Tidewater Community College, OpenStax, Open Courseware Consortium, OERu), there has been a considerable amount of reluctance on the part of higher ed to adopt the use of open resources. When adoption has taken place, it has often been initiated by an administrator or a professor; students in these situations have no opportunity to develop a personal connection with open education, nor to think about how it can apply to their lives outside of the context of their current course. In fact, research by HarvardX research fellow Justin Reich indicates that the explosion of freely available OER and education technology resources could serve to widen the opportunity gaps between wealthy and poor students because the latter lack the tools and institutional support to effectively utilize it.

Thomas Edison State College entered the world of open education by developing challenge exams for credit to match up with open courses. Working with the Saylor Academy, we have developed an affordable and self-directed degree program built around open courses that leads to an Associates of Science in Business Administration. While the creation of a $3,500 degree was ground-breaking, it is essentially a substitution model: "instead of this course, use this open resource to satisfy this requirement and meet this learning outcome." What is missing is an understanding of the real transformative value of open education among our students. We have used this experience to build something that will not only foster a deeper level of comprehension and appreciation, but also incorporate the learning they gain from using open resources into an experience that goes beyond what is possible in a traditional approach.

Our course teaches open education and its application at the student level. Students learn information literacy, critical thinking, and the development of a lifelong approach to learning: how to evaluate open resources for bias and for quality, how learning outcomes work, and how open resources can be used to gain the knowledge and skills necessary to master them in any course context. We show students how they can collaborate with each other and learn from each other, without having to rely on a faculty member to have all the answers. Finally, we teach them how everything they've learned can be applied within the current higher education system, and outside of it. This last component opens the door for lifelong learning, but also can fundamentally reduce the cost of a college education for anyone with the drive to pursue truly self-directed learning.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Phillips

Steve Phillips

Assessment Strategist, Thomas Edison State College
avatar for Marc Singer

Marc Singer

Vice Provost, Center for the Assessment of Learning, Thomas Edison State University
Talk to me about anything. I will try to keep up.


Friday November 21, 2014 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Richmond

1:45pm

Scaffolding Of Smart Cities With Open Educational Resources

The work presents and pilots the Proximity Layered Feedback Model aiming provide adaptive feedback from geolocated content in OER repositories.


Speakers
avatar for Bernardo Tabuenca

Bernardo Tabuenca

PhD candidate, Open University of The Netherlands
Ubiquitous support for lifelong learners


Friday November 21, 2014 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Blue Ridge Room

1:45pm

Utilizing Service-Learning to Facilitate Adult Basic Education OER Adoption
Session focus: Designers for Learning, a volunteer service-learning initiative for college students in instructional design programs, recently facilitated a pilot project to increase the adoption of open educational resources (OER) for adult basic education, an area unserved by existing OER models. This session will examine the tremendous untapped opportunity for OER adoption to support adult basic education, particularly by those outside of traditional educational settings. In addition, the collaborative instructional design process employed within the 100% virtual volunteer service-learning project will be reviewed, and recommendations for further OER adoption in this area will be discussed.

Target population: Adult basic education programs support those over the age of 18 who have not attained a high school diploma, a population of over 30 million adults in the United States alone. A central goal of adult basic education is to help learners achieve high school equivalency, often through successful completion of the General Educational Development (GED) test. In 2014, the requirements for the GED test were revised to align with the 2013 College and Career Readiness (CCR) standards released by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Vocational and Adult Education as a guide for adult education programs that prepare learners for post-secondary college and career training. While the CCR standards align with the K12 Common Core State Standards, the CCR standards are bundled into only five grade groupings.

Informal instructional setting: While adult basic education programs are offered in community colleges, learners pursuing their GED also receive support outside of traditional educational settings within community-based nonprofits and other social enterprises. In these nontraditional settings, learners often study independently, or with the support of volunteer tutors who may not be trained educators.

OER service-learning project overview: Working as volunteers for a drug and alcohol rehabilitation campus for homeless adults, 22 college instructional design students collaborated with the guidance of 19 faculty advisors and other volunteer subject-matter experts to complete five different instructional design projects to support those pursuing high school equivalency. Student designers in one project were responsible for mining and mapping existing OER to the CCR standards, including an analysis of existing OER designed to align with the K12 Common Core State Standards. Three project teams designed and developed a unit of instruction that aligns with one anchor CCR standard. These tutor-supported units of instruction are prototypes for future instructional design and development. In response to the new GED computer-based testing requirements, the fifth team produced instruction that introduced learners to the use of computers for learning. A central goal of all projects was the adaptation of existing OER for this adult basic education focus. In addition, all work produced for this project was licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Maddrell

Jennifer Maddrell

Designers for Learning
I founded Designers for Learning as a nonprofit to offer service-learning experiences for instructional design professional development. Ask me about our #OpenABE service-MOOC on Canvas Network. Participants in the service-MOOC are "gaining experience for good" by designing and developing OER for adult basic education both in OER Commons and Canvas Commons.
RD

Ronda Dorsey Neugebauer

Faculty Success Lead, Lumen Learning
My last 10 years in education have focused on improving at-risk students’ academic success. I'm passionate about collaborating with others to create, experience, and sustain teaching and learning success using OER.
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OER Project Director, Tacoma Community College
Librarian, Administrator | I am the OER Project Director at Tacoma Community College and I believe that adopting, adapting and accessing OER empowers faculty, students and administrations to grow educational opportunities. I've been a user, a pusher, a creator and a teacher of OER. (From the College Open Textbooks Community)


Friday November 21, 2014 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Roanoke

1:45pm

Rethinking Technology's Role in Sustaining the Future of the University
For the university to remain a relevant and valued institution in the future, it must expose the work of its people, including students, staff, and faculty. When institutions embrace open approaches to technologies, they are contributing to the public domain and sharing knowledge that would otherwise stay locked behind the secure doors of a closed LMS and then erased at the term's end. The University of British Columbia has backed the use of platforms and technologies to support open pedagogies and content for nearly a decade, but the past two years have represented a tipping point in terms of their impact at the institution and beyond. UBC's open technology framework evolved from an under the desk approach to a robust publishing platform with over 30,000 users. The session will provide an overview of the UBC framework and will cover topics including the positioning of these open technologies within other "enterprise" systems, in regards to the infrastructure, user management, and front end development. The session will also highlight few case studies of how such technologies are being used to meet academic needs through the creation of e-Portfolios, course blogs, classroom backchannels and microblogging, open educational resource (OER) development, and other learning and web publishing needs. The future of the university is open; universities must take ownership of their technologies or they run the risk of becoming irrelevant.

Speakers
avatar for Will Engle

Will Engle

Strategist, Open Education Initiatives, The University of British Columbia
Teaching and Learning Centre Staff
SM

Scott McMillan

University of British Colum
avatar for Novak Rogic

Novak Rogic

Web Strategy Manager, CTLT - UBC
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rogic


Friday November 21, 2014 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Crystal Ballroom

1:45pm

Ethics, Openness and the Future of Education
What difference does openness make to ethics' This session will examine this question both from the perspective of research into OER and the use of open resources in teaching and learning. An outline of the nature and importance of ethics will be provided before the basic principles of research ethics are outlined through an examination of the guidance provided by National Institutes of Health (2014) and BERA (2014). The importance and foundation of institutional approval for OER research activities is reiterated with a focus on underlying principles that can also be applied openly.

I argue that with a shift to informal (or extra-institutional) learning there is a risk that we lose some clarity over the nature and extent of our moral obligations when working outside institutional frameworks – what Weller (2013) has termed "guerilla" research activity. Innovations of this kind could be free of licensing permissions; they could be funded by kickstarter or public-private enterprise; or they could reflect individuals working as data journalists. But we might also speak of "guerilla" education for innovations taking place on the fringes of institutional activity – from using social media to going full-blown "edupunk" (Groom, 2008). These innovations which employ variants of opennesss can also bring out morally complex situations.

I show how the principles underlying traditional research ethics can be applied openly while noting that, whether working within or outside institutions, there is almost no existing guidance that explains the ethical implications of working openly. Similar issues are raised with MOOC, which operate outside institutions but while drawing on institutional reputations and values. With this in mind I sketch out scenarios we are likely to encounter in the future of education:

- Issues around privacy, security and big data
- Intellectual property conflicts
- Ensuring fair treatment of class students and equivalent online students
- Meeting obligations to content creators
- The ethical status of MOOCs and their obligations to their students
- Moral dimensions of open licenses
- The ethics of learning analytics and the data it produces

I argue that, while models for ethical analysis have been proposed (e.g. Farrow, 2011) more attention should be paid to the ethics of being open. I conclude with an examination of the idea that we have a moral obligation to be open, contrasting prudential and ethical approaches to open education. At the heart of the OER movement, I argue, is a strong moral impulse that should be recognized and celebrated rather than considered the preserve of the ideologue: openness is not reducible to lowering the marginal cost of educational resources. Openness is a diverse spectrum and to leverage its true potential we need to reflect deeply on how technology has the power to challenge the normative assumptions we make about education.


References

National Institutes of Health (2014). Protecting Human Research Participants. http://phrp.nihtraining.com/

BERA (2014) Ethical guidelines for educational research. http://www.bera.ac.uk/researchers-resources/resources-for-researchers
Weller, M. (2011). The Digital Scholar: How Technology is Changing Academic Practice. Bloomsbury Academic

Farrow, R. (2011). Mobile learning: a meta-ethical taxonomy. In: IADIS International Conference, Mobile Learning 2011, 10-12 March 2011, Avila, Spain.

Groom, J. (2008). "The Glass Bees". http://bavatuesdays.com/the-glass-bees/.

McAndrew, P. and Farrow, R., (2013). Open Educational Research: From the Practical to the Theoretical. In McGreal, R., Kinuthia W., & Marshall S. (eds.) Perspectives on open and distance learning: Open Educational Resources: Innovation, research and practice, Commonwealth of Learning, Athabasca University. https://oerknowledgecloud.org/sites/oerknowledgecloud.org/files/pub_PS_OER-IRP_CH5.pdf).

Robbin, J. "The Ethics of MOOCs". Inside Higher Ed. http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/sounding-board/ethics-moocs.

Weller, M. (2013). "The Art Of Guerrilla Research". Available from http://nogoodreason.typepad.co.uk/no_good_reason/2013/10/the-art-of-guerrilla-research.html.

Speakers
avatar for Rob Farrow

Rob Farrow

Research Fellow, The Open University
Research Fellow @openuniversity / Open Education through a philosophical lens / Projects: @oer_hub @gogn_oer @oerworldmap @JIME_journal / Cat: @tailz_of_terror | | Project URLS: | http://oerhub.net/ | https://oerworldmap.org/ | http://go-gn.net/ | http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/


Friday November 21, 2014 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Virginia Ballroom

2:30pm

Positive Institutional Consequences for Open Course Design

This presentation will describe and discuss the unintended positive institutional consequences for implementing an Open Course Design initiative at Chadron State College. These consequences are relevant to any institutional program of higher learning that chooses to move forward with an open education [resource] based instructional framework – at either the program, unit, or degree level.

Unintended positive institutional outcomes at Chadron State College include:
- Insuring Good Course Design? (i.e., Quality Matters Rubric);
- Increase in student learning-- based on clear identification and appropriate assessment of specific student course learning outcomes;
- Increase in curricular efficiency through curricular alignment activities across program courses to
eliminate concept redundancy, and to ensure scaffolding
and reinforcement of key student learning
outcomes;
- Provides an alternative path to program progression for non-traditional or displaced student clientele;
- Increases access to higher education programing;
- Supports the mission of the college by building on
Intentional Initiatives established during our
campus-based strategic planning efforts;
- Lowers educational costs to students through textbook zero course design;
- Provides for increased program transparency for external critics;
- Increases faculty collaboration and course/program articulation - between and among depts./campuses
- Engages faculty in a unified effort;
- Promotes discourse on program effectiveness & reflection of desired program outcome statements;
- Prompted the hiring of an institutional Instructional Designer;
- Prompted the hiring of a VP for Teaching and Learning Technologies; and
- Worked to ultimately establish a CSC Open Education Project Plan


Speakers
MC

Margaret Crouse

Dean, Chadron State College
avatar for Don King

Don King

Chair, Education Dept., Chadron State College
I'm in my 20th year here at Chadron State, and currently am Chairperson of the Education/Special Education Department. I hold a BS Degree from California Polytechnic State University in Agricultural Sciences, and a Ph.D. in Agriculture Education. I have worked in | 7-12 High School Vocational Agriculture, international agriculture programs (USAID Programs), and teacher education. | | I currently teach graduate and undergraduate level... Read More →


Friday November 21, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Richmond

2:30pm

Transformative power of open assessment and heutagogical investment in Rwanda

Open assessment in Rwanda catalysed non-formal learners’ self-determined learning in a quest for student loan for their higher education.


Speakers
avatar for Bernard Nkuyubwatsi

Bernard Nkuyubwatsi

PhD Research Student, University of Leicester
Bernard Nkuyubwatsi is a PhD research student at the Institute of Learning Innovation, University of Leicester since October 2012. Bernard’s research focuses on open educational resources and practices in widening participation in Rwandan higher education. Prior to joining the Institute of Learning Innovation, Bernard worked for Kigali Health Institute (KHI) for six years. He started this job as a tutorial assistant in 2007 and became... Read More →


Friday November 21, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Blue Ridge Room

2:30pm

19th Century Pedagogy, 21st Century Tools
The Center for Computer Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI), a non-profit consortium of law schools, has created eLangdell Press, an open casebook/textbook publishing imprint. Most of the technological hurdles of creating open casebooks have been conquered. Now it has reached its next hurdle: Getting the books into the classroom.

This panel will describe the three perspectives of the eLangdell Press adoption process. It will feature a member of the CALI eLangdell Press editorial staff, an author of eLangdell Press materials, and a professor that has adopted and adapted eLangdell Press materials for her classroom.

Speakers
avatar for Deb Cohen

Deb Cohen

Professor of Law & Director of Academic Success & Bar Programs, University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law
Teaching & Learning
avatar for Sarah Glassmeyer

Sarah Glassmeyer

Director of Community Development, CALI
Open Source, FOSS, Open Access, Scholarly Communication, Data, Being Awesome, Cats, eBooks, Open Law, Free Law, Libraries, Library, Information Literacy, Twitter, Blogs, Blogging, Cupcakes, Rabble Rousing, Coffee, Educational Technology, EdTech, Making lists of my interests, Legal Research, LRW, Open Education, OER, OPEN EVERYTHING, access to justice, long walks on the beach, pina coladas, getting caught in the rain., DISLIKES: The Man
avatar for Deb Quentel

Deb Quentel

Director of Curriculum Development & Associate Counsel, CALI
Distance education | CALI content including lessons and elangdell casebooks | online learning


Friday November 21, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Crystal Ballroom

2:30pm

Mookia: Open Courses Meet Social Learning
As a student studied in a small college in western China, Open Courses have opened my eyes, satisfied my curiosity, brought me to graduate school in the States, and broadened my knowledge further with world-class learning materials. It has changed my life. Mookia started as a personal desire to connect with other learners who are using open courses. It became a master's project, and then a multi-year quest and experiment to make something that might bridge the gaps that I experienced learning with open courses.

Mookia is an evolving platform grown out of that desire to enrich the open education ecology. Mookia allows users to interact with each other around three top-level objects: courses, groups, and profiles. Each of these objects will create social spaces for learners to collaborate and interact over the open education courses. Course pages allow learners to post notes, discussions, and reviews. Group pages allows learners to post discussion about topics that's cross-courses or subjects. User profile pages display all of learner's followed courses, users, and groups with learner's posts and contributions. Learners will be notified with recent activities of any of the followed objects.

Mookia platform attempts to: (1) bridge the gap between the overwhelming amount of available high-quality Open Course content, and the lack of social platform and communal space attached to the content, (2) reduce the cost of online interaction over a chaotic distributed network, while aggregating most of the learning activities in a social space, (3) encourage open social learning and sharing without pay walls and closed discussions, (4) not only bring connections between related courses, but also bridge the related courses with related groups, forming a more flexible learning network, (4) enhance the usability and accessibility of Open Educational Resources by providing an easier to use, and easier to discover platform by providing a catalogue of Open Courses with learner-generated content.

This presentation aims to demonstrate the potential use cases for the Mookia platform, share goals and challenges in the design process, and invite feedback, critique, and collaboration from educators and learners who are interested in the adoption and promotion of Open Courses or OpenCourseWare.

Speakers
avatar for Shaomeng Zhang

Shaomeng Zhang

University of Minnesota


Friday November 21, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Roanoke

2:30pm

ELMSLN: Open system design for open content production
What if the reason everyone seems so anti-LMS is that they are not structured correctly? LMS design, as one large single system, is setup to fail the OER community. MOOCs are at least a push in the right direction, but their frameworks are often closed, discouraging open development. If we had truly open, community driven platform for the creation of educational resources, we might see more truly OER materials being created.

This is the position ELMS Learning Network (ELMSLN) takes in its approach to edtech design. ELMSLN takes the major functionality of an LMS and spreads it out across a suite of open source tools. The experience is glued together by single-sign-on technologies like LTI to enable the best system selection for the job without sacrificing user experience.

These tools a built on a framework that includes other open systems such as Drupal and Piwik. Piwik allows for a Google analytics style framework but open source and data is hosted with whoever is utilizing it. This can used both for tracking and general data about students, or for statistical analysis of how effective OER are in reaching different global audiences.

Drupal 7, is a highly flexible yet complex CMS used to power high scale development projects. While Drupal is traditionally difficult to work with, ELMSLN packages it up in such a way that's easy both for code developers and content authors to understand. What it brings with it is a community of experts authoring functionality that can all be utilized to deliver courses and OER. The best part is that by aligning with this community, ELMSLN has access to the knowledge and expertise of thousands of contributed modules and highly trained developers who don't need to have any understanding of edtech in order to help improve it!

ELMSLN also comes packaged with support for LTI 1.0 provider capabilities for integration with current LMS offerings. This enables faculty at existing universities and colleges to keep their materials outside the LMS, yet still securely pass their traditional students through to their content seamlessly. ELMSLN's networked approach to edtech development, can allow OER material to reside in one toolset (out in the open) without fear of opening oneself up to PII or FERPA violations.

Part of the resistance to OER production is the technical and privacy barriers to participation, which are at the heart of how ELMSLN has been constructed. Attendees will walk away with a sense of the transformative nature of Drupal, who's using ELMSLN and how to get involved.

Speakers
MC

Michael Collins

Assistant Professor of Art, Penn State University
avatar for Bryan Ollendyke

Bryan Ollendyke

ELMS:LN Lead Developer, Penn State
I love talking about Philosophy and its influence on technology and how we can shape society through proper alignment of all three. Educational technology design is the thing I do, my passion is building a better, more open, more transparent, cheaper, faster, better planet through elimination of waste. Information Altruism, the giving away of ideas and information is what changes the world.


Friday November 21, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Virginia Ballroom

3:00pm

Next Generation for OER Movement: Aligning OER to Competency-Based Education at University of Maryland University College
University of Maryland University College is committed to replacing all paid resources with open educational resources by 2016. At the same time both graduate and undergraduate programs are redesigning curricula to be competency based. The drive to competency-based education is driven by the need to personalize learning for our diverse students. UMUC students often transfer with multiple community college and other transcripts, prior learning such as noncollegiate instruction, external exams and certifications, and informal learning at the undergraduate level. These students need more than a traditional model that does not have enough variation to support the multiple starting points required. At the graduate level, competency based education builds on personalization of content for the purpose of achieving mastery that will translate to being better prepared professionally.

As our programs are redesigned starting this fall, the academic directors, instructional support services and academic support teams are collaborating on the alignment of resources and assessments to support competencies. There is also a much smaller effort to commence pilots using adaptive learning to help students be successful. The launch of a competency-based approach means that not only will additional content resources be available but the alignment and mapping of resources to assessments becomes more critical to support self-paced study. The university has put into place processes to align program outcomes and assessments to competencies. A team of academics and instructional support work together to define and identify the educational resources needed to best support outcomes at various levels that can be shared across programs.

The processes, progress and challenges with a competency-based redesign and a commitment to use OER will be discussed.

Speakers
BM

Beth Mulherrin

University of Maryland University College


Friday November 21, 2014 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Richmond

3:00pm

Research Approach on assessment and feedback methods that impact students' engagement in MOOCs

The suggested research approach in order to examine the feedback and assessment models that affect the students' learning experience and consequently their engagement in MOOCs.


Speakers
avatar for Nikolaos Floratos

Nikolaos Floratos

PhD Researcher, Open University de Catalonia
Lifelong learner, professional project manager, Phd Researcher at OUC, Consultant in State Funding, eager to know as much as possible for MOOCs and aiming to advance the foundations for engaging MOOCs and fully on line courses


Friday November 21, 2014 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Blue Ridge Room

3:00pm

System-wide OER Adoption Initiatives
This presentation will discuss system-wide OER adoption initiatives in the University System of Maryland and Virginia Community College System.

Speakers
MB

MJ Bishop

Director, Kirwan Center for Academic Innovation, University System of Maryland
avatar for Richard Sebastian

Richard Sebastian

Director, OER Degree Initiative, Achieving the Dream
Dr. Richard Sebastian is the Director of Achieving the Dream's OER Degree Initiative, an effort to support colleges across the United States in designing degree programs using open educational resources. | | Before joining ATD, Richard was the Director of Teaching and Learning Technologies for the Virginia Community College System, providing vision, leadership, and support for effective use of teaching and learning technologies for the 23... Read More →


Friday November 21, 2014 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Virginia Ballroom

3:00pm

The Transition to Open Educational Resources at UMUC
By Fall 2014, 50 percent of all undergraduate courses at University of Maryland University College (UMUC) will use electronic resources at no cost to the students. As we approach the first milestone of this initiative, we examine the lessons we've learned along the way that will influence our approach to the upcoming milestones – 100 percent of all UMUC undergraduate courses using electronic resources at no cost to the student by Fall 2015, and all graduate courses by Fall 2016.

Speakers
MW

Megan Wilson

University of Maryland University College


Friday November 21, 2014 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Crystal Ballroom

3:45pm

A New Chapter in Prior Learning Assessment and Degree Completion
Thanks to the advent of Internet and, more importantly, open educational resources (OER), we have finally ended the scarcity of knowledge and begun to level the playing field in higher education. Through open textbooks and courses, students with an internet connection have access to more information than ever before in human history. Independent learners are amassing their own expertise outside of traditional classrooms. However, knowledge alone is not always enough. In a world where your socio-economic position is in part dependent on the certification of your knowledge, we must also end the scarcity of the credential. One solution is Prior Learning Assessment (PLA).

Thomas Edison State College is a leader in the field of PLA, and was predicated on the notion that it does not matter where or how you learned something, but that you know it. With this in mind, TESC has teamed up with the Saylor Academy - a purveyor of 300+ free college level courses, expertly crafted out of aggregated OER and custom content. Together we saw the potential to create a transformative new pathway for students looking to earn a credential for their untethered online learning.

Hence, the Open Course Option, AS in Business Administration program. This new degree combines OER, credit-by-exam, and portfolio development, resulting in something truly unique in higher education: open courseware that is free and available whenever the student needs it; assessment options that reward students not just for seat time, but for what they know; and a self-directed, cost-effective accredited degree.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Phillips

Steve Phillips

Assessment Strategist, Thomas Edison State College
avatar for Devon Ritter

Devon Ritter

Director of Education, Saylor Academy


Friday November 21, 2014 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Richmond

3:45pm

Influence of Open Educational Resources (OER) in increasing Entry to University Education among the Marginalized Communities in Kenya

OER panacea 4 education 4 all in Africa; knowledge 4 public good, education opportunity 2 marginalized pupils & focus on demand driven education 4 social transformation.


Friday November 21, 2014 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Blue Ridge Room

3:45pm

Adopting and adapting: The higher-education faculty journey of opening education and resources
Amid the skyrocketing costs of higher education in the United States, open educational resources (OERs) appear to be simple cost saving solutions. However, when viewing the OER movement against the landscape of broader social change, OER looks more like the front edge of a transformational tsunami bearing down on the institution of higher education. Why? Our current systems of higher education are largely built on the competitive paradigms of the industrial era, with aims of concentrating profit; closed access to education is then the means to ensure advantage over competitors. Faculty members who were acculturated into these industrial-era educational models find that their own sense of expertise relies on maintaining the mental model of themselves as authorities and gatekeepers of disciplinary knowledge. It is for this reason that OERs often occur as threatening to faculty - they represent a worldview that knowledge is found everywhere, can be accessed by anyone, and can be enhanced by anyone. In short, OERs undermine the expert model; they represent the emergence of collaborative learning communities that support genuinely student-centered learning. Successfully adopting OERs and adapting one's pedagogy then represents a substantial shift toward student-centered and peer-to-peer learning; this shift for faculty is a profound one.

What conditions must be in place for faculty to successfully transition from a sage to a coach in an educational resource model that is open? We have been exploring this question for the last four years through a learning initiative involving faculty members from the humanities, the natural sciences and engineering. What we have learned is that a robust learning system for integrating OERs has many counter-intuitive characteristics. One set of features concerns the faculty dispositions. Beyond a desire to experiment with alternative pedagogies, it seems that faculty also need to posses authenticity, presence, vulnerability to one's own state as a learner, satiation with the human need for respect, and skillful means for managing conflict. These dispositions also seem to require the presence of a safe and caring community that includes other faculty and students, fairly open lines of communication within this community and the ability to self-organize.

In this mini-workshop, we explore with the audience the experience of deconstructing the expert model to make room for OERs. We also share what can be expected for faculty during the journey of change and what can be done to support faculty in the change process.

Speakers
avatar for linda vanasupa

linda vanasupa

Professor, Materials Engineering, California Polytechnic State University
I'm still learning. Librarians are one of my three favorite kinds of people along with mothers and nurses, so I am looking forward to meeting you. | | I am passionate about what seems to me to be the present moment in our collective history; this feels to me as a shift in human consciousness toward integrating "science" and "humanities" (one might equally say "western" and "eastern" world views or "masculine" and "feminine" energies... Read More →


Friday November 21, 2014 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Crystal Ballroom

3:45pm

Crowd sourcing of assessments in a developing country
The proposal builds upon an exploratory study, conducted in 2010, to determine whether teachers in a developing country were able to create good quality multiple-choice questions for primary school students. The study also developed and evaluated an adoption model to ascertain if the teachers would actually contribute to such a Wiki. 22 teachers from public and private schools situated in different parts of Pakistan (urban and rural) participated in the project. The exercise ran for about a month at the end of which a survey was conducted to get teachers' feedback. The survey was designed to get feedback on five adoption factors: usefulness, ease of use, enjoyment, intention to adopt, and attitude - and five quality factors: correctness, reliability, efficiency, usability and verifiability. The teachers were asked to rate each adoption factor on a Likert 1 to 5 scale, and two expert judges (with M.Ed. degrees and at least 15 years of relevant experience) were asked to rate the quality factors on the same scale. The study found that, given student learning outcomes, content constraints, and a Bloom's assessment level, a reasonable number of teachers were able to formulate quality questions, and that there was a strong intention to use such a system. Teachers with "high intention" to adopt also had a better attitude, enjoyed making questions and found the process easy to use. However, there was no obvious relationship between "intention to use" and "ability to pose good assessments". In addition, there was no obvious predictor of where the good question contributors came from.

The results of the experimental study were used to implement a small-scale prototype project of "crowd-sourcing based assessment collection system", involving approximately 100 teachers from public and private schools from Islamabad and Peshawar. A survey tool was developed to get feedback from participating teachers. Formal interviews were also conducted from two sets of sample teachers - those who actively contributed to the system, and those who did not contribute at all. The interviews were based on motivational factors (enthusiasm and persistence) as well as social parameters (altruism and empathy); the objective was to ascertain the factors responsible for motivating or de-motivating users. The survey found that the success of the system depended on such adoption factors as the availability of infrastructure and the quality of teacher training. Evidence was also found of the common crowd sourcing problems of long tails, since most of the questions contributed to a limited set of topics.

Based on the feedback from stakeholders and adoption pattern of teachers, a follow-up medium scale adoption model was proposed successfully to the Ministry of IT, Government of Pakistan under the ICT R&D fund. The project kicked off in July 2013 and has since developed a crowd-sourcing platform and assessment engine, which generates exams based on different difficulty levels. The next stage in this project is the start of the deployment phase; it will introduce teachers to the concept and train them on how to use the system. The project plans to target approximately 1700 teachers from public and private schools across Pakistan. An adoption period of six months has been set for users to use the system. A mid-term analysis will provide an opportunity for error correction. A final assessment will be conducted at the end of 2014 in order to analyze the findings from the deployment and propose a full-scale adoption model to crowd source assessments. I hope to bring the results to share at the Conference.

Speakers
avatar for Luna Banuri

Luna Banuri

Director, Tele Taleem Foundation


Friday November 21, 2014 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Virginia Ballroom

4:15pm

Increasing Opportunity, Access, and Speed to Degree through Open Courses
Life alone presents many barriers for adults when returning to school. Minimizing cost and time, and maximizing course relevance is the goal of Open Campus, a new initiative of a for-profit university offered in collaboration with a small consortium of schools. It is the result of creating and organizing a one-stop-shop for all things "open" with the goal of awarding college credit. Like other open courses, learners can access courses and resources in a self-paced environment at no charge; however, what makes Open Campus unique is the opportunity to earn college credit by filling course gaps in a degree program and earning credit for open courses. The consortium partners provide a variety of educational options to the learners.

The intent of Open Campus is to revolutionize the traditional approach to learning through the use of open resources, creating transparent opportunities for learners to accelerate their time-to-degree at low or no cost. Open Campus is a "sense making" venture. Sense making for learners in that it combines no risk, open access, self-paced, and relevant courses with the opportunity to earn college credit in a one-stop-shop.

Open Campus, built on a proprietary platform, allows learners to build a personal learning plan (or portfolio) by choosing courses developed by the university and working at their own pace. Students can also supplement their portfolio by bringing in open courses that they may have taken elsewhere. The added value that this brings to learners is the opportunity to earn college credit in one of multiple ways. First, the portfolio can be submitted for faculty evaluation. Faculty evaluators trained in evaluating prior learning, review and provide a credit recommendation for the portfolio. Second, challenge exams are available for all of the university's open courses. Successful completion of the challenge exams results in credit awarded by the university. There are charges for the evaluations, but none for taking the courses, including the one designed to help the student create a portfolio.

Lastly, to make that important connect to career resources, Open Campus also provides the learners with free access to CareerJourney, a self-paced course which provides practical strategies for career advancement, professional development, and personal innovation; CareerJourney also includes the ability to match skill gaps to courses.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Huggins

Susan Huggins

Executive Director, OC@KU
JI

John Ittelson

Professor, CSU Monterey Bay


Friday November 21, 2014 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Richmond

4:15pm

Accessibility issues in MOOCs: potential services for people with functional diversity

MOOCs include benefits for people in vulnerable groups but full access to the educational content and the learning platform must be assured.



Friday November 21, 2014 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Blue Ridge Room

4:15pm

Make Your Case: Funding a Library-Led OER Initiative in Tough Economic Times
Adoption of Open Educational Resources (OERs) by faculty who currently use expensive commercial textbooks has a great potential to generate cost savings for students and allow faculty to experiment with new forms of innovative pedagogy. One successful model for kickstarting adoption of OERs on campus is developing library-led faculty incentive programs for creating and using OERs. Temple University Libraries' Alternate Textbook Project and University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries' Open Education Initiative award faculty mini-grants of $1000-2000 to faculty who adopt OERs in their classes. Both of these initiatives have been extremely successful, popular with faculty, and saved students hundreds of thousands of dollars in textbook costs.

In Fall 2013, we proposed a $10,000 grant program to our Libraries administration to create a similar faculty incentive program to promote mass adoption of OERs at North Carolina State University. University of North Carolina system-wide budget cuts in the same fiscal year resulted in a significant cut to the Libraries, making justifying spending on this project extremely important. Our Alt-Textbook Project was successfully funded in full and will begin awarding grants in Spring 2015. In this presentation, we will share our successful proposal for funding and the strategies we used to make the case to our administration to help libraries that may be considering their own OER initiative.

We believe that promoting OERs is a natural fit for many priorities of academic libraries, even in a time of declining library budgets. Developing an OER initiative has allowed us to create and expand strategic partnerships with many other campus units, including our Office of Faculty Development, Distance Education Learning Technology Applications (DELTA), and Campus Bookstore. NCSU Libraries currently purchases a reserves copy of every textbook for every course on campus, so, broad usage of OERs also has the potential to save our Libraries money in our collections budget.

Libraries can also make the case for an OER faculty incentive program by tying their request for funds to pending legislation. On November 14, 2013 Senators Dick Durbin (D-IL) and Al Franken (D-MN) introduced The Affordable College Textbook Act. This legislation is intended to control the costs of textbooks for students by making high-quality textbooks easily and publicly accessible for free. This bill would create a competitive grants program through which universities and colleges could obtain funding to support the creation of open textbooks.

We also emphasized the extremely high return on investment of existing faculty incentive programs in making our case to funders. We expect to realize hundreds of thousands of dollars in savings for students who are able to use free OERs, and for faculty members to continue using OERs in semesters after the grant funding has ended, based on the early success of our Open Physics Textbook. In 2010, the Libraries purchased the site license for an introductory physics textbook and made it available for 1,300 NCSU students who take introductory physics courses each semester as a free e-textbook or inexpensive print-on-demand textbook. The textbook is still in use today in our introductory courses and very popular with students.

Speakers
avatar for William Cross

William Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship, North Carolina State University
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Will earned an M.A. in Technology & Communication, a J.D. in Law, and an M.S.L.S. in Library Science. Before joining the Copyright and Digital... Read More →
avatar for Brendan O'Connell

Brendan O'Connell

Instructional Technology Librarian, Smith College Libraries
I am Instructional Technology Librarian at Smith College Libraries, where I contribute to a variety of emerging projects. I am acutely interested in what academic libraries mean in the liberal arts context. | | Before this, I was a Library Fellow at North Carolina State University Libraries, where I contributed to launching the NCSU Libraries Alt-Textbook Project , designing the D.H. Hill Library Makerspace, and collaborating with faculty on... Read More →


Friday November 21, 2014 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Crystal Ballroom

4:15pm

Domain of One's Own: Aggregating Community on the Open Web
The Domain of One's Own project at the University of Mary Washington provides each member of the UMW community the opportunity to get their own domain and web hosting. Providing democratized space for students to explore their own digital identity presents a challenge for aggregating and building a sense of community from these disparate spaces. UMW has built a community syndication hub that feeds in the work happening across the project and provides a lens to truly understand the life of the mind at the university through deliberate tagging and indexing of that content. In this session you can learn more about how that system was built on WordPress and what it represents for the larger Domain of One's Own project.

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Brazell

Ryan Brazell

Instructional Technology Specialist, University of Mary Washington
MB

Martha Burtis

Director, Digital Knowledge Center, University of Mary Washington
TO

Tim Owens

Instructional Tech SpecialistUniversity of Mary Washington


Friday November 21, 2014 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Virginia Ballroom